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So I installed my first packages this past thursday.

The pint paintcan we filled with syrup was empty when we checked up on things briefly on Saturday.

So now I'm at something of a quandary. I don't want to keep opening the top of my hive to keep replacing feeding cans every two days, at least not until they've had a chance to settle down. But on the other hand, I'm afraid of attracting predators/coons if I leave the feeder can on top of the langstroth.

Right now we have a hive body, then an empty honey super on top which we place the feeder onto. No inner hive cover or anything else.

What would be best? Risk attracting coons/yellowjackets and leave the feeder on top, which would mean not opening the top of the hive? Or just quickly open the empty super every few days and replace the can as quickly as possible.

I just don't want them to abscond, it won't be as big an issue in a week or so, but I've read I'm supposed to leave them be for 5-7 days, just can't do that if they're going to go through their syrup that quickly.

We installed an internal feeder for the TBH that can be replaced from the outside. That one is working great!
 

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If you have an inner cover on the hive, then the hole in the feeder can over the hole in the inner cover. You won't disturb the bees much when changing the feed.

Put you're hive extra body & outer cover over the can like you have been doing.
 

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Why not place an inner cover on the hive body then the feeder and empty super on top of that? Then you can refill the feeder and the bees won't be bothered in the least. Place a small piece of wood over the hole while you're doing the refill and the bees won't give you a second thought.

Letting the bees settle in is good but not at the cost of not feeding them when they need it.

Wayne

Added: KQ6AR typed faster than me!
 

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It is suggested to leave them alone because you really want to get in there and pull a frame out to see results of your new endeavor. Admit it I still do after decades of watching and learning from the bees. They will not be set back by lifting the cover to feed or just take a peak. Just resist the urge to go any deeper.
 

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If you have the resources you could invest in a hive top feeder. Chances are you may need one sooner or later. A hive top feeder can be filled by removing the cover only. My supplier recommended leaving the feed on them for a full month.
 

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I drill a hole in a piece of plywood the size of my jars [3 1/2"] the plywood is cut to the size of the super... it's very simple then to put a super over the jar with a top and when you change the bottles, no problem with the bees.
 

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I arrived at this exact same solution, after getting disgusted with the whole ziploc baggie fiasco. The holes in the plywood hold the jars very snugly, and it works well. I haven't yet put a super over the jars, but I plan to do that tomorrow after I finish making them. But the jars are very clean, so they haven't attracted any pests even though they're outside.
 

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Does smoeone have a simple and "quick" recipe for patties? I didn't get any and our weather is getting colder rather than warmer so thought I better give them more than just sugar water.
 
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