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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The weather here in Portland has been lovely and the ladies have been out and about. They are making sorties and returning packed with pollen & nectar (we have a large nursery very close to us). They appear be doing well. I'm going to open the hive later today to take a peek.

My question is I've noticed a that while bees are entering and leaving the hive there will be one bee near the entrance butt up, gland exposed fanning pheromone into the air.

Is she just making a chem trail for the returning bees? I'm trying to figure it out because I assumed that the flyers know how to return to the hive.
 

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When i get the bananna smell, i just hold my arms out and let them get it out of their system. It was so bad 2 weeks ago, i walked away and in to a pine tree thicket to confuse them, and it didnt work great. Took 20 stings that day...oh well.

Anyway, are you sure they aren't cooling the hive or trying ot cool the hive....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm sure it's not cooling behavior, the body language is different. Abdomen is stretched out exposing that nice little gland they have. They don't do this when cooling. It was only one bee as well.

Anyway, I opened the hive today and noticed three supercedure cells, with one open. They were small so I'm assuming they are emergency cells. That might explain the unprovoked sting the other day as they are feeling a little testy without a queen. My right forearm looks like Popeye's.

I'll check the hive again next weekend...
 

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This may be a dumb question, but have they swarmed? or are they getting ready to swarm? I remember when i caught my first swarm, they did the same thing bringing in all the rest of the bees. It was quite a sight. When mine were queenless they were as docile as could be, although i have heard them be both ways, both mean and docile. I am very curious now, so keep us updated if you would!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's it! Head down, butt up, gland exposed and wings humming:

"The Nasonov (alternatively, Nasanov) pheromone is released by worker bees to orient returning forager bees back to the colony. To broadcast this scent, bees raise their abdomens, which contain the Nasonov glands, and fan their wings vigorously."

It's all very fascinating. I'm a hopeless Bee Nerd.
 
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