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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I'm in a little of a pickle. I have two hives and am not sure what I should do next. I tried to requeen on june 5 and had both queens killed. One I thought was queenless, but must have swarmed and there was a virgin in there. The other (my strong hive) had a queen that I found and pinched and waited a couple of days before I introduced the new queen. As I said both killed there queens. Two weeks after this attempt I opened them up and found a queen in both. My stronger hive then swarmed. I have no brood or eggs in both. After an inspection yesterday I can find no queens, still no eggs or brood. My weaker hive has not seen an egg in over five weeks now. They both are very testy. They both have lots of stores and honey. I moved the top deep up to be a honey super after they had backfilled it and both have them almost all caped, but still will not draw comb on the medium supers I placed in between the deeps. There is still room in the lower deep to lay. Not sure what to do now. I need to get these hives queenright. Do I need to buy a nuc and do a paper combine for the weaker hive. I'm concerned that even if I do get only a queen in there laying the numbers will be to slight to get the colony back to good. There is still a good amount of bees in there now. The stronger hive that swarmed 12 days ago has not seen an egg for over 3 1/2 weeks. There are still lots of bees in the stronger hive. I hope this all makes sense. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
 

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Well, I'm in a little of a pickle. I have two hives and am not sure what I should do next.
I am sure you were talked into starting with two hives. As the saying goes two hives gives you options ... until it doesn't. Almost everyone who starts beekeeping gets to the point where you don't know what to do next. My advice at this point (and some may think it is bad advice) is to step back and let what ever happens, happen. If you are lucky enough to get one of the hives to be queen right then you can combine or just see if you can get that hive through winter. Do not even think of taking honey unless it dies.
 

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It's a little too early to find eggs in the hive that swarmed. Normally you can expect to find eggs about three weeks after the swarm. So you will have to wait alittle longer. The other hive needs a queen ASAP, or you will be in danger of having laying workers. Can you beg or borrow a frame of brood from a friend? Then order a replacement queen first thing in the morning. The brood frame will help keep them going until you can get a new queen. When you add the new queen don't forget to check that frame for queen cells before you introduce her. Destroy any you find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice. I'm going to chew it over tonight and come up with a plan. I only know one other person who keeps bees and he and I are not talking so much these days. I called him and left a message yesterday, and no call. Thought that might be the case. I put an add on craigslist and... maybe? doubt it though. So queen ordered tomorrow or not, I think I just have to hope for the best.
 
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