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Hello, I'm new to beekeeping. I have 2 hives and over this winter would like to build my own boxes. Can anyone in the Dfw area suggest on where they get pine or any other lumber not expensive? I've called many lumber yard and they only have crazy pricing on 1x8 and 1x12.

Thanks for your time and help!

CJ
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

Not in the DFW area, been there a few times though. You will find that sourcing wood for building of boxes is almost an art form in itself. The big box stores are out to make a killing on every last stick of wood they sell. The mills are in contacts a lot of times with the big box stores too. So my advice to you is look for a local mill that uses a band saw mill. Then get a good planer if you want them to be nice and smooth.

Once in a while if you are buying in bulk quantity you can find a real deal through some of the bee supply houses for already made equipment.

Good luck on your quest. I've had to source mine from PA myself to get good kiln dried wood that I can plane down myself at a descent price. Still have to drive for 7 hours one way to get it though. lol..
 

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If you live close to Home Depot they normally have a caull bin that is %70 off. I just swing in when I am driving by an pick up goodes. Lates was a sheet of 1-1/5 foarm board. Less than $7.00
 

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Welcome to Beesource!


Note that all the boards in any Lang style hive are under 24" long, and most (perhaps all, depending on the design you adopt) of those are under 20". That means that beekeepers can utilize "cut-offs" that may be of little other use, and may be available at a very low price. You will have to explore your local area with an open mind:) to find potential sources of inexpensive lumber.
 

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I've used Cutlist for layout for medium hive bodies or supers and can get 19 supers out of 2 sheets of 3/4" A/C plywood.
No waste at all. Use a 60 or 72 tooth carbide blade and it smooths the cuts up. About 70.00$ on upper price of 2 sheets from Lowes or Home Depot. Gonna check on marine plywood also this year and availability in Houston area.
I also cut my handholds using Cleos method.
Rabbet the ends and use Titebond III for glue and then staples or nails or screws.
Paint I get free from paint stores. So its slathered on in 3 coats.
My grandsons love to help and I pay them what the 19 supers and materials would have cost me.
 

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I forgot to mention that my mediums are also 8 frame vs 10 frame. I'm 64 with bad shoulders and cannot tell difference in the white pine vs the plywood weight wise.
I have through the years, pry the hive bodies apart from the edges of the long side where my hive tool contacts the full 3/4" top part of the bodies and stay away from the 3/8" rabbeted top edges. Its always a little more of a pain but saves the rabbeted ends through the seasons.
Also, the plywood frame rests part vs the white pine rests are always tuffer to separate the frames and are easier to gouge with the hive tool making the rests a little on the rough side vs the pine. If I have the time, I lightly sand the rests and then lightly rub bees wax along them. Don't know if it actually long term helps but in my mind it does.
 
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