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Hello,
This is my first season beekeeping. I live in Connecticut and need to prepare my hive for the winter. During my last two visits, I have seen no new eggs, leading me to believe the queen is gone. The entire upper deep is full of capped honey,and the lower deep had mature eggs.

Is it too late in the season to introduce a new queen? Will my hive survive the winter without a queen? :s Any advice is much appreciated, I am worried about my hive ! :(

Sincerely,
Joe.
 

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Hello,
This is my first season beekeeping. I live in Connecticut and need to prepare my hive for the winter. During my last two visits, I have seen no new eggs, leading me to believe the queen is gone. The entire upper deep is full of capped honey,and the lower deep had mature eggs.

Is it too late in the season to introduce a new queen? Will my hive survive the winter without a queen? :s Any advice is much appreciated, I am worried about my hive ! :(

Sincerely,
Joe.
Queens stop laying for the winter, some earlier than others. Since my last blossom was quite a while ago, I haven't seen any brood in any of my carniolan hives in a while...
 

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Welcome to Beesource!

Based on the information you have provided, its not really possible to say for sure whether your hive has a queen or not. Brood raising is very much curtailed during the winter, and so there may still be a queen in your hive.

> the lower deep had mature eggs

Do you meant you saw capped brood? Eggs are tiny, and only stay as eggs for 3-4 days. More on brood development cycle timing is at this Michael Bush "beemath" page:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm
 

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Marking your queens is a good practice, and makes it a lot easier and faster to locate her.

Also know her age and can make decisions about replacing her.
 
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