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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two hives that began in march. They seemed to have done well. I use the large brood hives and there are two on each hive that seems to look good (Built up, filled out) I started feeding them sugar water in September. (50 / 50 water and sugar, plus Honey-B-Healthy) They went for it well and I was adding every other day. Then, almost a month ago, both hives virtually stopped consuming the sugar water. The activity and numbers still seem to be very good, and I am not aware of any change. I would appreciate any thoughts, information, etc. about this problem. Frankly, it is driving me nuts! Thanks a lot!
 

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You didn't say how much you fed at a time, but they could be full of syrup. What did the frames look like last time you inspected their food stores?
 

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My suspicion is that they are full up or temp is too cold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You didn't say how much you fed at a time, but they could be full of syrup. What did the frames look like last time you inspected their food stores?
The top feeder holds right much (close to a gallon, I guess) My worry is - They were really going after it. Then they stopped. Their food stores looked good when I began feeding, and still do. - - - THANKS for your reply.
 

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Jnick32, In my experience, the reasons bees stop taking syrup is usually because a nectar flow has started, the combs are filled, depending on how you are feeding it is too cold for the bees to access the syrup, or the bees are sick.

You have been doing inspections, so you should know how many frames of food the hives have stored. You know what your temperatures have been, so you know if it has been too cool for the bees to move to the syrup and to move it to the cells for storage. You have been looking at the condition of the brood in the colonies, and how the adult bees look and act, so you should have an idea about the colony health. I know nothing about your nectar flows, but in my location there would be no nectar flow. By a process of elimination you should be able to make a reasonable "guess" as to the problem. Reasonable "guesses" is all we beekeepers are ever able to do, that is why it is called "the art of beekeeping."
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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There may actually be some sort if a nectar flow in SC right now. Although I am feeding and the bees are taking it, they are also bringing in quite a bit of pollen here in Richmond I am guessing whatever is producing the pollen is also providing some nectar and it can only be better further south.
 
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