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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in building a long Lang hive to try out.

I've read up on this some and the general consensus is to NOT use a follower board. It seems like this would be too much space for a new colony. In a traditional Lang, I would never start a nuc in three deeps but that seems like what folks are doing in long Langs.

Am I missing something?
 

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In any fixed-volume hive I make provision for reducing the volume, either by the fitting of dummy frames or by the use of a 'follower board'. The f/b is more flexible in use, and each one lives in it's Long Hive permanently, so never gets lost.

I make my f/boards as 'thermal curtains' with a couple of inches removed from the bottom, so that any bees finding themselves on the wrong side can always find their way back.

I find volume reduction to be very useful, and cannot understand why anyone would NOT do this.
LJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is my thought as well.

Have you (or anyone else) used an OAV wand in this type of hive? Anything special I need to do to get the vapor to the back?
 

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You raise a good point. Until recently I've been squirting OAV in through the front entrance, but have never been fully confident that the 'cloud' has penetrated right up to the back - so I started thinking about delivering OAV in through the top - from a more-or less central position. This is now my current mode of delivery. BTW, my Long Hives are at maximum 33" long.

I keep thinking about the idea of a removable floor section - or with a 4ft Long Hive, maybe two sections: one at the front; one at the back - in order to deliver OAV from below. Perhaps such a scheme would suit the wand type of vapouriser ?

The idea of removable floor sections isn't new, of course, here's a graphic showing such a floor section fitted to a Layens Hive - my guess is that it's purpose in those days was to make cleaning-out the hive that much easier:

Perhaps there's a solution in something like that ?
'best
LJ
 

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I've read up on this some and the general consensus is to NOT use a follower board.
In discussions it came up many times over - people do NOT distinguish between 1)division board and 2)follower board.
To many (most?) - #2 is the same as #1 (complete and ultimate separation of the spaces).
And so the resulting advice is to NOT use it.

The idea of a free-hanging dummy frame (an old, historical feature) has been lost somewhere, somehow.
So we are trying to re-introduce it.
ANY hive can benefit from a dummy frame (even vertical hives - just as well).
 

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....
I make my f/boards as 'thermal curtains' with a couple of inches removed from the bottom, so that any bees finding themselves on the wrong side can always find their way back....
LJ
In my case, I allow complete access around the F/boards (on all three sides around it).

One reason (and now re-confirmed for my situation) - during the cold season bees much prefer to travel in the warmer parts of the hive - the upper parts. They almost totally ignore the lower entrances, and the hive floor, and do not go under the F/board (similar to lower entrances).

They will readily go around the F/Board, however.

This is important during the critical spring season I have it here - cold and unstable.
So - a local consideration.
 

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Bees move into big cavities all the time.
 

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For anyone who might be interested in the use of boards ...

What I prefer to call a 'thermal curtain', Charles Dadant calls a 'Division Board' (even though - strictly speaking - it doesn't 'divide' anything). He describes it's construction, it's uses, and the reason for it not touching the hive floor, on pages 39-41 of his book "System of Beekeeping", 1920.



As this thread is related to framed Long Hives, Dadant discusses the 'Long Idea' Hive on page 26 of the above book - using the DeLayens Hive as an example.




Doolittle was another firm advocate of 'Partition Boards' - he used 2 Fixed Division Boards in each of his hives in order to create areas at the sides for the production of comb honey, and a further 2 Moveable Boards with which to contract the size of the centrally located brood nest prior to the onset of winter. He also left a gap (of at least 1/2") at the bottom of the moveable boards.
LJ
 
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