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Hello. My name is Vladimir. The reason I’m writing this message is because the company I work for (Cisco systems B.V., worldwide leader in IT technologies, www.cisco.com) initiated the project related to bees and how to prevent them from becoming extinct.A group of volunteers (my colleagues) together with me decided to focus on how using the power of modern technology, we can help both apiarists and bees. :)

At the moment, we decided to focus on so-called Digital Beehives with various sensors, Wi-Fi and other technology to see how we can make it better in the future. Having decades of experience in IT, we believe that together with beekeepers and experts in that industry, we can make something meaningful.

In order to improve beehives, we should focus on how Digital Beehives work now (covering both advantages and drawbacks) and how you would like it to be in the future.

Please feel free to tell me your story if you ever used Digital Beehives. If not, please let me know how would you like it to be, which functions you want it to have, etc.
My corporate e-mail is [email protected]
You can also call me on +31 6 46 71 47 44

Thank you. I appreciate your input and look forward to working together. :)
 

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I appreciate your work on this but I think you are under a fundamental misunderstanding about honeybees. There is almost no chance that honeybees will become extinct - unless the human race predeceases them. And even then, pockets of honeybees would survive as long as there is any chance of life on Earth.

There is so much agenda-driven publicity about honeybees that it is hard to sort the truth out from reality. While they are under several novel challenges at the moment honeybees, because they are a very valuable sector of human-supported livestock, are not dying off at a faster rate than they can be replaced. They are astoundingly hardy and fecund.

Other wild and native pollinators may be being stressed to the point of extinction, but not honeybees.

What is changing is the economic calculus of keeping honeybees, both in the sense of the amount of work needed to keep them and the amount of money it takes to cover that work.

Whether technological solutions such as the digitization of colony monitoring, which up until now has always been done using the eyes, and other senses, of people skilled at hands-on bee-husbandry will help contain the rising costs is the main question. Except in academic situations where specific factors are being closely watched, I wonder if more information obtained more cheaply, is going to make it easier to care well for more colonies, in ways that improve the health, longevity, and efficiency of the bees themselves?

If you really want to consider this issue, get some bees and put your hands in some hives.

Just my two cents.
 

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If you want to help bees, take that money and buy land and set it aside and plant native wild flowers, the biggest problem I see with bees is reduced diversified forrage.
 

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I work in the IT field and am familiar with a lot of Cisco equipment. I'd be more than happy for them to sponsor one of my hives. Send me a thousand bucks, I'll put their logo on the hive and refer the bees as "Cisco Bees", and will report back to you on how they do.
 
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