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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This morning I noticed lots of bees out of the hive flying around- I automatically thought swam- but they were not all togeter like I have seen in photos- (now I thingk straglers). Found a swam in a near by tree- up at the top!
I checked my hives and found loads of honey on the frames with some larva and maybe a few eggs. I added a honey super. The other hive has a honey super and there was lots of honey and nector. I was not able to see eggs but maybe I needed to go to the lowest frames??? There were tons of bees in each hive. I have only seen the queen of one hive once. Not sure what to do... ? The bees are making lots of honey. I have not checked the lowest frames- maybe I should. A few wks ago I thought one hive had queen cellls but at that time it also had lots of eggs. Any suggestions...
 

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Your hives have 'tons' of bees, lots of honey being made, and larvae. Sounds pretty good to me! :)
You saw a swarm in a tree nearby but aren't exactly sure it came from one of your hives, correct? Can you clarify the problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well, my boyfriend just came home and he thinks the hive in the tree is too large to be my bees. I think they are mine because I saw a bunch flying in that area - probably a hundred or so. If the bees did swam would you notice a diffence in the hive ie- amt of bees in the hive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well, my boyfriend just came home and he thinks the hive in the tree is too large to be my bees. I think they are mine because I saw a bunch flying in that area - probably a hundred or so. If the bees did swam would you notice a diffence in the hive ie- amt of bees in the hive? I did go ahead and add a honey super to one hive.
 

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The act of swarming starts days or a couple of week prior to a hive issuing a swarm. If the hive is strong enough you may have a difficult time determining which hive swarmed. One clue is when you examine the hive that swarmed you won’t see eggs. This happens because the workers put the queen on a diet so she can fly with the swarm. You should see swarm cells, and a lot of capped brood. A hive will not perform a reproductive swarm unless they are health and strong and there are adequate nectar and pollen sources.

To prevent an after swarm I will select a couple of the best looking queen cells and destroy the rest. Being careful not to damage the remaining queen cells when reinserting the frame. This helps the hive rebound quicker and get back into production of surplus honey for the beekeeper. In the end you have a strong hive with a young healthy queen.
We cannot completely stop swarming only minimize it so the best and most experienced beekeepers will have hives swarm. After all it is a natural reproductive process that perpetuates the species.

If your lucky and catch your own swarms they will amaze you at how fast they build up. I was lucky enough to watch five hives swarm and quickly capture them since May. All are already in double deeps and will be getting surplus supers soon.
 

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I would agree with omie and kq6ar- sounds like you've got some healty hives-congrats! Give them a home if you have the equipment, if not, wish them safe travels and godspeed- there's probably not an area in the country that couldn't use more bees.
 
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