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WOW ! Did I goof! I thought I new what I was doing. A year ago I started three hives. One from a nuc, one from a swarm, and one from a package. The package failed I dont know why. The other two were going great so I left them alone (six medium supers on each) A couple of months ago there were about 4 or 5 frames of honey in each of the supers. Today (at noon , 70 degrees) I went down to the hives with this plan. I would rearrange the frames so that I had a few supers full of honey and put a triangle escape under them and harvest the honey later. Well I found that the two hives were overloaded with bees and the supers were glued together with honey and the bees were very mad, smoke didn't help. They stung me right thru my gloves. I managed to break apart the supers but there was honey and bees all over the place. I restacked the supers and retreated. A large cloud of bees followed be back to my patio and stayed with me for about a half an hour. I guess I put the supers on too fast and should have removed the honey sooner but other than to try to get some local help what should I do next? Should I let them keep their **** honey ? I have another package coming in a few days! This is the stuff the hobby books dont tell you about.
:confused:
 

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>The package failed I dont know why.

Blame it on the Varroa. If they didn't starve anyway. We all do.
And it's likely.

>Well I found that the two hives were overloaded with bees

That's a good thing.

> and the supers were glued together with honey

No, they were stuck together with propolis, but they may also be burred together with comb.

>and the bees were very mad, smoke didn't help.

Did you smoke them a lot? I wouldn't. Too much smoke will make them angry. Too little will not clam them. I'd smoke them a little, and wait a while. Then open up the top and put a couple of puffs in there and wait another minute. Then open the hive up.

>They stung me right thru my gloves.

They will do that.

>I managed to break apart the supers but there was honey and bees all over the place.

Sounds like a lot of burr comb. Maybe they ran out of room? Maybe the beespace between the boxes is off?

> I restacked the supers and retreated. A large cloud of bees followed be back to my patio and stayed with me for about a half an hour.

If you get normal EHB upset they will follow you a ways for a few minutes. They will NOT follow you in a cloud and they will NOT stay with you for a half an hour. These bees are too hot!

> I guess I put the supers on too fast and should have removed the honey sooner but other than to try to get some local help what should I do next?

Divide and conquer. A lot of small boxes of hot bees are MUCH easier to handle than a large hive of bees.

Get, borrow, make, or makshift enough bottom boards and lids to have one for each box. Any kind of board big enough will do for a lid. Any board big enough and propped to make an entrance will do for a bottom.

Order a queen for each box. Suit up as much as possible. Set the bottom boards behind one of the hives and put each box on it's own bottom with it's own lid. Put an empty (or at least one of the supers) back on the old bottom board.

Walk away. Go back the next day and put a queen in a cage in every box. Walk away and come back in two or three days. Open each box up and look at the bees on the queen cage. If they are bitting and fighting the queen and if there are a lot of bees in that box, it probably has the queen. Especially if the queen in the cage is dead, this is probably the box with the queen. If they are still too hot to handle in one box (doubtful but possible) then put half the frames in another box and wait for them to calm down. Look for the queen in each of those two boxes. When you find her, squish her. Come back the next day and see who is accepting the queens in the cages (as eveidenced by them feeding the queen instead of biting the wires.) Pull the cork on the candy on the ones that are accepting the queens. If the one with the queen killed her, combine that box with the least populated box and their queen cage.

>Should I let them keep their **** honey ?

No.

> I have another package coming in a few days! This is the stuff the hobby books dont tell you about.

You have phycho hot bees. You NEED to resolve this. Bees should not act like this.
 

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When you find her, squish her ... you have phycho hot bees.
Gabe, with a hive that hot, I'd drive a wooden stake through her heart just to be sure. I use a whittled-down toothpick.
 

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I strongly agree with MB on this. Are both hives acting the same way? You either need to requeen or depopulate these hives. They are in all proablity AHB, you could save a sample of 30 or so bees from each hive and have them tested to be sure. You need to do something before someone gets hurt.
 

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REQUEEN is the only way. If you dont have enough equipment on hand make something like MB said. You need to get rid of that queen ASAP. Or if you have a supplier near you order enough equipment to split them as many times as you think you can. Also have them checked for AHB.
 

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On the positive side. Cancel the package ASAP. Your gonna have a half dozen colonies soon it sounds.

Gonna have to nail down a queen supplier.

As usual...... excellent advise Michael.
 

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The lesson is to tear into those boxes more often. They will be easier to work as the boxes will not get so much burr comb and propolis. Also you'll probably catch the bees before they go ballistic.

Keep your brood nest open..... Good luck
 

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Gabe-
Trial by fire. Hang in there, you'll be fine. Good stuff to have in your resume. That what don't kill you makes you stronger.
Bees can be moody, you might not get the same response next time, could be better, could be worse.
Put your squished queens in a jar with some alcohol if you want to have some swarm lure.
Good luck and enjoy the process, every step of the way.-j
 

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why do you put the dead queen in alcohol, just for preservation?

Thanks,
Craig
 

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The alcohol disolved the pheromones and then you use the alcohol for swarm lure. You can even put some on some cotton, tie it to a helium balloon tie that to a fishing pole and go fishing for drones. You may find a flyway or a Drone Congregation Area (DCA).
 
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