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Discussion Starter #1
As the subject says, I'm a newbee following Michael Bush's advice and methods that I read on his website. I just installed a 5 deep-frame nuc into an 8-frame deep hive. I will be using 8-frame mediums without foundation for everything else. I added 3 no-foundation frames to the deep (popsicle sticks and bamboo skewers in a frame).

HERE'S THE QUESTION. I am using a top entrance with no bottom entrance, like Mr. Bush suggests. What type of bottom board should I use? RIght now I have it just sitting on a piece of plywood.

Most of his material assumes some level of knowledge, and I have almost none, so i'm not gleaning info that others probably do when they read through the various subjects on his website. If I have no bottom entrance, do I still use a bottom like one with an entrance, but without one? And a screened board to check for beetles?

I think I'm missing details on how to do a proper start using Mr. Bush's methods. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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HERE'S THE QUESTION. I am using a top entrance with no bottom entrance, like Mr. Bush suggests.
Does he really suggest that? I'm sure he'll be along to clarify. But I would be concerned about loss of ventilation without the bottom entrance. This can of course be alleviated in any number of ways.

Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here's the quote:

Top Entrance Frequently Asked Questions:

Question:

Without a bottom entrance, don't they have trouble hauling out the dead bees and keeping the hive clean?

Answer:

In my observation, no more than with a bottom entrance. Either way dead bees accumulate over winter. Either way they accumulate some in the fall. Either way they usually keep it pretty clean in the middle of the year. I've watched a house keeping bee in my observation hive (which has a bottom entrance), haul dead bees all over the hive from top to bottom before finally finding the entrance at the bottom. I don't think it matters at all.
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I have seen other suggestions that you should have both. However, if all you had was a bottom entrance, that would interfere with ventilation, too.

As an engineer, but not a beekeeper, it seems to me that a top entrance alone would have better ventilation than a bottom entrance alone. Having both, it seems to me, would create a draft, which might be good for summer, but not for winter.
 

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I have seen other suggestions that you should have both. However, if all you had was a bottom entrance, that would interfere with ventilation, too.
Well I'm not arguing, but I often prop the top cover a bit so there is top ventilation. At which point the notch in the top cover becomes a top entrance.

Anyway, best of luck with your new hive.

Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I apologize if I sounded like I was arguing. I meant to be discussing.

Unless, of course, by "arguing" you meant to present "a selected series of statements intending to establish a proposition". In that case, I guess I was arguing.

;o)
 

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While my own beekeeping methods are very different to Michael Bushes, gotta hand it to Michael, the man himself is a friendly and approachable guy.

I would suggest sending him a personal message, I'm sure he will be happy to help.
 

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I believe Michael Bush uses only top entrances is to prevent dead bees or snow from blocking the only exit.
I use both upper and lower entrances but I have a very mild winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's also to prevent skunks from using the hive as an all-you-can-eat buffet. We have lot's o' them polecats here in Arkinsaw!
 
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