Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The world-wide decline in honeybee colonies during of the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor (Varroa), and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses.

Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally-functioning colonies.

All colonies with Varroa underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet only a significant correlation between DWV viral load and over-wintering colony losses were observed.

The long held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe Varroa infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of Varroa to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in over-wintering colony losses.

Deformed wing virus implicated in over-wintering honeybee colony losses
Andrea C. Highfield, et al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Sorry for my ignorance, but I was under the impression that DWV resulted from other bee diseases. Just to clarify, DWV is a standalone virus and may infect an otherwise healthy colony? And from what you are saying, ultimately lead to the demise of the colony without any mites being present?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
That is depressing news.
So, Deformed Wing Virus is a virus? Any idea what causes it? How it can be prevented? Treated? Up to this point I, probably like others, thought it was caused by the mites. Seems I recall the mites vectored it. If they didn't cause it, they were the carriers of the virus.
Thanks,
Steven
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,430 Posts
Didn't realize there was a Deformed Wing Virus

Knew there was Deformed Winged Bees

My understanding that the deformities were caused by the verroa mite feeding on the bee pupa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
Is this suggesting that thousands of bees in a hive with deformed wing virus may suddenly fly away and leave no trace of dead bees, as in CCD? Wouldnt there be lots of dead bees with deformed wings left behind?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,079 Posts
Omie;Wouldnt there be lots of dead bees with deformed wings left behind?[/QUOTE said:
This started as 22 hives in fall and is down 50% to date.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Thanks for the link PeterLoringBorst.

As you suspected, a subscription is needed to access the article. Would sure be great if the journal would allow thearticle to be made available to the beekeeping community at no charge (or at a nominal 1-time charge - to sign up for a subscription just to access one reference article is rediculous in this day and age...).

Until then, I guess your recap of the article is the best we have to go on.

Is there anything said as far as possible solutions and/or implications?


-fafrd
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
I'm not a believer that varroa or SHB carry the DWV. To me, that seems far fetched (but not impossible).

It does seem likely and probable that there is deformed wing virus alone and independant of varroa and SHB, just as you can find AFB spores in hives that aren't showing symptoms of AFB. I think it is more likely that DWV shows up in hives under pressure from varroa or SHB, which allows the DWV to gain a foothold and cross the economic threshhold in the same way that a weak hive will succomb to AFB.

Used to, one of the methods of dealing with AFB was to combine the infected hive with the strongest hive in your apiary. Even today, you will find experienced beekeepers who will tell you that if you give a hive a frame infected with a half dozen scales of AFB, the bees can clean it up. (especially if you break the cell wall down to the midrib if it is old tough comb)

Hygeinic bees will often throw out AFB infected larva. How many of us would notice if a hive threw out a couple hundred AFB infected larva over the course of a summer? We probably wouldn't notice, as it is a small percentage of the overall bees. Likewise, how many of us would notice if our hives threw out a couple hundred larva/bees infected with DWV? Often, we don't notice problems until they are well past the economic threshhold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm not a believer that varroa or SHB carry the DWV. Used to, one of the methods of dealing with AFB was to combine the infected hive with the strongest hive in your apiary.
Are you joking? That's like taking rotten food from the garbage and eating it. Nobody in their right mind would deliberately combine a foul brood hive with a healthy one! I have no idea where you got that idea but for God's sake stop promoting it.

By the way, I worked as a New York State Bee Inspector for several years and we burned hundreds of hives that tested positive for AFB. Burning is the only treatment permitted in most states, and many countries as well. Some jurisdictions allow treatment with antibiotics.

Nobody would suggest combining it with another hive!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
well the research showed that if a SHB feed on larva that was infected with DWV that it was a carrier DWV after that. And if look at it that makes sense to me. As far as putting a AFB hive on a good strong hive that is just asking to infect both hives and the outcome is two dead instead of one. if you find AFB the best thing to do as mentioned above is burn it and be done with it .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Isn't it the commonly held belief about viruses that they are present, but need a vector to get them into the effected party. Varroa mites are a vector for viruses. They expose the bees to viruses by their method of feeding.

Isn't this generally correct?

I was shocked by Countryboys' AFB statement too. I never heard of anyone doing that w/ AFB infected equipment as a control method. Maybe it's regional? Maybe it is an ancient practice? Maybe Countryboy didn't express himself the way he thought he had?

I hope no one uses this technique. I don't believe that Countryboy was suggesting it. I hope not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
i dont presume to speak for countryboy but since he is currently offline i'll post this small quote "Used to, one of the methods of dealing with AFB..." note the phrases "used to" and "one of" i had a neighbor that kept bees in gums for years,but i'm not proposing that as a best practice either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I'm not a believer that varroa or SHB carry the DWV. To me, that seems far fetched (but not impossible).

Used to, one of the methods of dealing with AFB was to combine the infected hive with the strongest hive in your apiary. Even today, you will find experienced beekeepers who will tell you that if you give a hive a frame infected with a half dozen scales of AFB, the bees can clean it up. (especially if you break the cell wall down to the midrib if it is old tough comb)
Just because we don't believe something, doesn't mean it isn't true. And like others, I seriously question both the experience, and the wisdom, of beekeepers who deliberately introduce AFB into otherwise healthy hives. That is just nuts. Yes, bees can remove diseased larvae as a means of control But the article in The Hive and the Honey Bee indicates that a single spore will/can infect a larvae. Further, (p. 1089) "There are no strains of honey bees immune to AFB. However, different degrees of resistance to the disease have been shown." An "experienced" beekeeper would know how dangerous playing with AFB would be.
Regards,
Steven
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top