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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up two nucs this evening, two hour drive home with a/c blasting.

Placed the nucs and remove the caps. One hive a few bees come out and the other the bees pour out the hole and clumps drop on the ground. This is all happening at 8 pm.

The queen is in the hive in a queen box.

What will I find in the morning?

As I took the one picture a bee said I was bothering her so I left.
 

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It means they got pretty hot and have come out to cool off.

What will you find in the morning? If any bees died due to suffocation / overheating you will find dead bees, but looks like at least some survived so long as the queen is good things will normalise. Recommend putting in a bigger hive with a larger entrance.
 

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65 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
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The queen "in a queen box" may be part of the issue. A nuc is (hopefully) five frames of bees, brood in all stages, with resources.
In short, a functioning mini colony including the queen that has been at least accepted, if not the queen that produced the brood.
Sounds like your producer made a split, stuck in a "mated" queen that has not been released and started laying yet, and sold it as a nuc.
Some producers will tell customers the queen is in a cage to "protect her during transit".
Sounds plausible but suspect, imho.
 

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Most commercial nuc producers don't have "native" nuc queens, they are most of the time assembled from larger hives/multiple hives. That by itself should not be a major concern, if queen is not accepted they normally give you another one, as they realize themselves that they cant achieve 100% success. In this particular case however I would suspect bees were too stressed after spending 2 hours in motion, it would have been better to leave them to settle for few hours (in the shade if possible) before opening the entrance.
Would be interesting to hear an update what happened next day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
‘‘Tis the next morning.
I was a bit worried about the hive that the bees didn’t swarm out of. Had they gotten too hot and died?

Went out first thing and both nucs had a steady stream of bees going in and out.
So they survived.

These nucs are from a bee person that does pollination in the Sacramento area. Next he says he is off to pollinate watermelons.
He assembled 5 frame nucs and added a caged queen, it is not the hives original queen. So he says to let sit in the nuc for 5 days and then transfer to hive box.
I got from him because the local guy charges 165 for a 4 frame nuc and you have to trade frames. This guy was only $100, so I could get 2 nucs.

3rd year with bees, 3rd year buying nucs. First year was a disaster
second year was going great, but the hive died/starved/froze in a hive full of honey, but we should have insulated it.
this year we have 2 hives so that we can deal with requeening if necessary.
 

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Learn about varroa mites if you don't want to buy bees again next year.
 

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He assembled 5 frame nucs and added a caged queen, it is not the hives original queen. So he says to let sit in the nuc for 5 days and then transfer to hive box.
Sounds all good, you may be set up for a good season.

As per Beemandan, learn about mites. Mites build up numbers unnoticed in big strong hives through summer, then when the bees naturally reduce their numbers in fall and early winter, the mite / bee ratio gets real bad and the hive dies. Based on your description that sounds exactly like what happened to your bees last season. It's a trap for new players because it often happens to the big healthy looking hives and the beekeeper is fooled into thinking he does not need to treat to get rid of the mites.
 

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The bees were assembled from several hives.

So they are hanging out on the porch, cooling off, having a discussion on who is going to get which job. The old lady is tied up anyway, some idiot locked her in a room, because she claims she isn't our real mom, I bet it's just a conspiracy theory. This may take about 5 days because none of them want to be the undertaker bee. Most of them want to go play in the flowers, where as some prefer to babysit. The young bees are complaining because they have to make bread again, and have to clean the house. The drones aren't much help, some want the workers to leave some of the honey/nectar uncapped so it will ferment so they can get drunk.

:scratch:
 

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>hive died/starved/froze in a hive full of honey, but we should have insulated it.

Bees in Lake County, CA do not die of freezing in a hive filled with honey. They do not have to be insulated. They die of mites and viruses.
 

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Picked up two nucs this evening, two hour drive home with a/c blasting.

Placed the nucs and remove the caps. One hive a few bees come out and the other the bees pour out the hole and clumps drop on the ground. This is all happening at 8 pm.

The queen is in the hive in a queen box.

What will I find in the morning?

As I took the one picture a bee said I was bothering her so I left.
Do you have a Queen in both boxes?
I am wondering if the "clump" that fell to the ground had a Queen within that was released prematurely from her cage.

Alex
 

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‘‘Tis the next morning.

Went out first thing and both nucs had a steady stream of bees going in and out.
So they survived.
I am also wondering if the steady stream of bees are robbers from one nuc robbing the other.

Are both Queens in their cages? I ask because on your previous post you stated, "The" queen is in the hive in a queen box.

Alex

Edit; It also appears in the photo that the nucs are side by side. There could be a lot of drifting as well.
 

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This is the second time in a few days I’ve heard a newer beekeeper buying a nuc having a caged queen; as we all know a nuc is a mini colony with a LAYING queen, that is what you pay for.
 

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This is the second time in a few days I’ve heard a newer beekeeper buying a nuc having a caged queen; as we all know a nuc is a mini colony with a LAYING queen, that is what you pay for.
It probably was a laying queen just from another "mating" mini colony. I don't think any reputable nuc seller would sell untested queen...
 

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I suspect lynnemabry is figuring out that there is a reason real nucs sell north of $150 each. There is no uncertainty involved when you purchase a functioning mini colony. I hope the bees are settling down and getting organized.
 

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It probably was a laying queen just from another "mating" mini colony. I don't think any reputable nuc seller would sell untested queen...
Deb did not suggest it was an untested queen. And the individual that sold those nucs was NOT a reputable nuc seller. There have been many discussions on Beesource about what constitutes a nuc. One thing is clear, the brood in the nuc is from that queen and no other. Bees themselves, maybe not.
 

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It probably was a laying queen just from another "mating" mini colony. I don't think any reputable nuc seller would sell untested queen...
It still isn’t the queen from that colony, her hive, with her pheromones in there, which is considered a nucleous colony; they still have to accept her.
 

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some outfits cage the queen
Aloes them to show the queen to a customer if they ask, keeps her safe and uncrushed in transport, and alows the end user to insure/verifie she is safely transferred to the new hive.
Stops the "you sold me a nuc with out a queen" complaints that can happen outer wise

I am sure there are some out there that just toss a banked queen in a box with brood as well, just like the ones that shake a package in to a nuc, or the ones who hold it for a week and skim off a frame of brood

I don't think any reputable nuc seller would sell untested queen.
arguably it happens most of the time. A tested queens means her brood has emerged and been evaluated, very few wait the extra time. Very few tested queens are sold, especially in the spring.
 

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Deb did not suggest it was an untested queen. And the individual that sold those nucs was NOT a reputable nuc seller. There have been many discussions on Beesource about what constitutes a nuc. One thing is clear, the brood in the nuc is from that queen and no other. Bees themselves, maybe not.
How do you know the brood is from the caged queen that came with the nuc? Is that the way they sell a nucleous colony now?
 

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some outfits cage the queen
Aloes them to show the queen to a customer if they ask, keeps her safe in transport, and alows the end user to insure/verifie she is safely transferred to the new hive. Stops the "you sold me a nuc with out a queen" complaints.
I know I am being cynical here, but that does not make sense to me and gives leeway to selling splits NOT a true nucleous colony. you show them the nuc or a reputable dealer will guarantee a laying queen, and if one ends up not laying will replace the nuc.
 
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