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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I'm hoping to avoid more foolishness on my part. Thus, reaching out to forum. Based on the simple events below, wondering....

Do I still have time to regenerate a queen?
I will be leaving country for 2 wks. Will this be a problem? If so, I may recruit a retired beekeeper for my absence.

THANKS for any feedback!...michael

  • Day 1: New NUC transferred into a deep box.

  • Day 8: Inspection - hive has new brood, plus pollen and nectar.

  • Day 16: Inspection - I find 2 supercedure cells and remove before realizing there are no eggs or larvae. This hive is very likely queenless! I see a single cell that appears to have multiple eggs. No others. I immediately add a frame of open brood from my strong hive.

  • Day 17: Today (I'm writing this post)
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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As long as the frame you provided had eggs as well as open brood, you have done what you can do. That you are leaving for two weeks is probably a good thing as you won't be tempted to see how the bees are coming along with making a new queen.

Hopefully the takeaway from this is NEVER destroy a supercedure cell until you have verified that you have a laying queen with a solid brood pattern. The bees are way smarter than us when it comes to queens. (See tag line below)
 

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As JW said, if your frame of open brood had eggs or just hatched larvae, you should be okay. You don’t want to add larvae that is more mature, as it has already started the growth process toward worker bee, and not queen.

You can open the hive to verify queen cells in the next few days if you’d like to, after that I wouldn’t open the hive until 30 days after you added the frame. Assuming the eggs on the frame were laid the day you moved it (not probable but most conservative)...16 days to queen emergence + 14 days to mature/mate/begin laying = 30 days. On your timeline above that would be Day 46.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK, so even though I foolishly removed the two supercedure cells, the fresh brood from another hive will ensure they form a new queen.

Well, I've definitely learned a lesson. I've had a lot of swarms in the past, so I was too eager to remove those supercedures before checking for eggs.

Much thanks!
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Here is a simple rule. Don't remove queen cells. It won't stop them swarming. I will make them hoplessly queenless. Leave them. Decide what you think the purpose of them is, and respond accordingly. If they are swarming, split them. If they are superseding, leave them alone.
 
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