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Hey Bob-
PS- Love the OAV dead drop count. If you go to mitecalculator.com it will convert your dead drop count into a percent of infestation. Personally I like DDC's more than washes. Would also add an OAV dose(s) in fall as well in addition to what GG mentioned. I pull inspection boards daily in the fall. It's an early indicator of a mite bomb and drift.
 

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Hello Lalldredge - Thanks a bunch for the varroa calculator site. My plot, via Apple's Numbers, took a bit of work. I am going back to Microsoft Excel. I am not sure of the correlation to OAV versus OAD. OAV , seemingly, has a time delay before a heavy mite drop. I wait 3-4 days. OAD has a rapid response and 24 hour waiting period may be accurate. SO I am a bit confused and will read it again. Doing DDC produces some interesting data when treating and counting more than one or two hives. The SUM plot really amplifies the story.
 

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6a 4th yr 9 colonies inc. 2 resource hives
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Hey Robert- I killed my first hives from doing repeated OAD’s in late summer. Had read enough conflicting info to think it was okay. Too hard on brood. OAD Is very good once when broodless but now that I do OAV I will never do it again.
 

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I was fortunate to be able to combine some old guys advise OAV before it was approved and personal research, especially European articles. I got off on the right foot with OAV. Someone in my area spread the idea that varporization was too dangerous and promoted other treatments along with OAD. I went my own way as a newbie - made the right choice. I have to remember to bring my 1/2 mask with me. It is very effective against Coronavirus. No one gets near me when I wear it.
 

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To answer the OP's question: the wand is great, if you have a mite drop 48 hrs later of more than 50 dead mites on the bottom board, do it again until you get less than that. The OAV wand gets 95% of the phoretic/exposed mites... but 2/3 of the mites are hiding with the capped brood.

I like OAV in late Sept through early Nov - which is every 2 weeks - not to deal with mites that accumulated during the summer, but to deal with the thousands (literally - I counted them) that can flood into a hive that goes robbing and comes back with more than honey.

In my area, the queen starts to slow down in early Oct, when the pollen and nectar get more sparse. Typically hive collapse from home-grown mites starts couple weeks later, when all the mites come out of the brood and latch on to the adults. Then on a fly day (sometimes they are 3 in a month in Oct!), some of my hives find these dying hives... and can bring back several hundred mites in a day.
 

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In my opinion regular monitoring and treatments is very important. It makes no sense to me to delay treatment until the fall if mite counts are high earlier in the year. Those hives are much more likely to be dead outs.

So you need to know throughout the months where bees are active. Because mites feed on fat body tissue, the damage is already done and the bees ability to function is compromised. The mites damage what is essentially the bees thyroid, for lack of a better equivalent. Fat body tissue controls 9 or 10 main body functions in bees.

I think this video explains it very well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK2Xi0ST4rA

How you choose to treat is your choice, however understanding the issue at hand might cause you to reconsider ignoring the problem until it is too late.

Not mentioning names but, I do know of one commercial operator who didn't treat properly and lost 2300 of 2400 hives in 2 years to varroa.
 
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