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:doh::cry:Well I gotta say with as much as I have read I am still making mistakes. Set out two new colonies with marked queens on tuesday. Looked in on them wednesday and the queens were still caged with tons of workers milling about.
Did not bother them yesterday, outside temps rose up to the mid 80's. Looked today and one queen and her 'tribe' are gone to parts unknown. The other colony is very robust with a freed queen somewhere amongst them.
Just happened to read that new colonies should not be placed too close together as this might happen. Three feet must be too close.
With as robust as the remaining group appear I figure some of the swarm must have decided to stay put.
I am gonna be a novice beek forever, sigh.
 

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STOP checking on them. For a couple weeks if you can stand it. The disturbance at this point can interfere with queen acceptance or cause absconding. Once they're established you can start the learning process and get to know them in earnest, but try to hold off for now.
 

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I had read that you shoudn't check on them for a full week after hiving them. Any disturbances they might blame the new queen for and kill her off. I know it's hard but...
 

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I also do direct release of the queen for new packages. Havn't had any issues with doing it that way.
 

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The proximity of one hive to another does not cause absconding... but as you've discovered, disturbing them daily can be a strong contributing factor. There should have been installation instructions sent with your packages. Or at least in books you have available. If my memory is correct, you're not supposed to disturb them for at least 5 days after hiving... and only then to check to see if the queen is released. If not, punch a hole thru the candy end of the queen cage, and return her to the hive.
Better luck next time.
 

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I always block them in for several days as well, at least until they start drawing comb.
 

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I always dump packages as late in the evening as possible, sometimes ending up with flashlights. That way I know they’ll stay put overnight. Never had one leave a hive. Packages are just now making it up to us northerners, not even a sign of dandelion yet in upstate NY but my girls are very busy.
I also release the queen if the package has been together for a few days with the queen in there already. Std. entrance reducer as small as it goes. Inside feeder.
 

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Yea, I agree with not bothering them. I keep them closed up with screen wire over the enterance for at least 3 days. I also do this with my swarms and cutouts. Feed, feed, feed and insure they are well ventelated.
 

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Don't beat yourself up on this one. Many of us have done the same thing and it worked out OK. This is a good "seminar." I agree, having hives close to one another shouldn't cause a colony to abscond. Maybe it was dumb luck, but I don't remember any of my first colonies leaving after I played the new-bee peek-a-boo game! Although, I was devastated after my first swarm up and left, just as I thought I was educated on these insects! Yet another seminar and still learning almost 30 years later.
 
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