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I have two hives started from packages in April. Made full inspections yesterday. One has has all brood in bottom deep super and has honey only in second deep super. About 45 pounds of honey. My second hive has brood in both deep supers. Twice as many bees. Their honey is all but gone, maybe 8 to 10 pounds. We are in a dearth here in Georgia. Should I feed this second hive with sugar syrup? If so, should it be 1:1 or 2:1? I have read that if you begin 2:1 that the first feeding should contain Fumagillin. Is it too early to provide Fumagillin or should I wait till later on in the fall for that? Thanks for your help!
 

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yes feed them 2:1. They should store the syrup above which will start to push the brood chamber down. As for the fumagillin you wont get a straight answer here. Many will say yes and many will say no. I have not used it for over 5 years but plan to give it to them this fall after our huge looses last winter
 

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Split the brood and honey between the two hives to equal them out. Brood in the middle honey on the outside. Either smoke them to beat all get out or newspaper combine the top boxes. Once combined you might not have to feed but if you do feed both to keep the robbing at bay.
 

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Ask 10 bee keepers get 8 different answers, I am feeding a couple of hives in Ga now, 1 to 1 sugar water. We have not had goldenrod bloom yet, hopefully it will make a huge difference in hives stores. Don't panic yet but what is feeding going to hurt. The hive doing well why weaken it? Just what I would do,I do not claim to be a expert, usually the answer in somewhere in the middle of all advice.
 

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If you feel that hive two is in imminent danger of starving by all means feed it. Feed 1:1 using an inside the hive feeder. Do NOT use an entrance feeder. Don't worry about the Fumagillin yet, if you decide to use it you want the syrup that contains it stored for winter - what you will be doing now is keeping the bees alive. 8 to 10 pounds of honey sounds like a three day supply, depending on the number of bees in the hive.

If you want to solve your issue without spending any money then equalizing the honey between the two hives is a good bet.

Do you have a notion as to why your first colony is so far ahead in terms of stores? Is it population - the difference between a good queen and a soso queen? If this is your conclusion you might think about replacing the queen in hive 2.
 
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