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Discussion Starter #1
I am a newbee. Installed 2 Nucs into 2
8 frame deeps on May 4. The hives are on a roof top at the Jersey Shore. I’m getting close to adding a second box. The colonies are doing fine. I do not care in the least about extracting Honey or not in my first year?? I just want to learn and get experience about being a beekeeper. I’ve watched hours of videos like everyone else.
I would like some advice whether to try single brood box with queen excluder and medium supers on top or double brood box with or without excluders??? I say this as a newbee. I am using plastic wax coated foundation. Being new , I have no drawn out frames. That is why I’m not sure which way to begin my hive management?? Single or Double brood box. Thank you in advance for your thoughts
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I would stay with the more traditional approach of double deep brood boxes and medium supers. Forego the queen excluder until next year. Add the second deep box and be sure to pull up two of the drawn brood frames and place them in the top box over the remaining brood frames still in the bottom. Fill in the open spaces on the sides of the broodnest with fresh frames. Do not add the supers until the second deep is mostly drawn out.
 

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I agree. Start with a double brood chamber. It might be a bit more work when they mature and you're inspecting but sometimes managing a colony in a single box can be a challenge especially over-wintering. Welcome to Beesource!
 

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It depends on where you are and we have no idea. In the south, they can and do go with one brood box. In the north, they use two and sometimes 3. I'm on the border. I tried a few with one deep and one medium last year and they made it just fine. I think I still prefer two deep for the added safety margin at my location.

My best overwintering success is with 5 frame deep nucs stacked 2 high. I haven't lost one of those yet.


Edit: I missed you are on the Jersey Shore.
 

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Since you are using 8-frame equipment I would definitely plan on trying to get a second brood box in this, your first summer. You may hit a dearth later in July and have trouble getting even that much done. Sixteen deep frames is still 20% less than a double 10-frame box, so not too much. As mentioned skip the queen excluder and just keep them making brood-nest sized combs as long as you can.

If your hives are on a roof on the shore, what are your storm plans? Even without a Hurricane, you will still have to have them secured not just sitting there. I was born in south Jersey (Brigantine Island) so I know the weather. Up here, north of Albany, NY, I keep ratchet straps available under every hive stand so all I have to do is cinch them down. Sometimes you don't have a lot of warning with windstorms, though my farm here has had both hurricane and tornado storms in the past 20 years. But nothing like the you would get on the shore.

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am in Monmouth County about 3 miles from ocean. I have a concrete block on the covers. About 30 pounds a piece. The roof that they are on is surrounded by a 3 foot wall. Pretty well protected by the wind. I inspected both hives this morning and they are not quite ready for a second box. I will take your consensus and go with the traditional 2nd deep brood box. Thank You for all of your great advise!!
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Good luck with your bees!
 

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I don't know how many frames of capped brood you have, but keep a close eye on them because when all those new bees start emerging the colony will grow much more quickly, especially if you feed or there is a strong flow. Exploding is the common term, but in a good way.

Good luck,
Alex
 
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