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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How much of a concern are azaleas, rhododendrons, trumpet flowers, and the like to a new beekeeper? (Is it irresponsible to keep bees in such an area?)


My mother and I want to keep bees, and I was certified last year but we haven't started buying the equipment for the bees or the bees themselves. We're concerned as she lives in an upper middle class neighborhood in the Charlotte NC area and has some very strong azaleas, rhododendrons, trumpet vines, and yellow jasmine plants. I have no space for bees myself other wise I would not be asking this.

Edit:: Thank you very much for your fast responses. I apologize for the lack of focus in my question. As far as I have seen there aren't many yellow jasmine in the area, but I will definitely keep an eye out when I do get my bees together.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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The particular plants in your mother's yard are of little concern for the bees. After all, they are foraging on over 8,000 acres of landscaping. I do not see my bees working the azaleas here at my house when they are in bloom. Carpenter bees on the other hand are buzzing all about.
 

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I agree gcolbert.
From the list given the one to be concerned about the most IMO is yellow jasmine (jessamine), especially if the area is full of it as it
produces a fair amount of nectar.
Blooms in early spring and if no
other nectar sources are available the bees will suffer from it's toxicity. Young bees die off first and then larvae die in the comb.
A spring time problem during buildup.
 

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I assume she's referring to having successfully completed the apprentice/beginning beekeeping course thru her local club and has received certification of such from NC State Beekeeping Association.
Do you mean, one needs to be "certified" by the gov. to keep bees in NC?
 

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I agree gcolbert.
From the list given the one to be concerned about the most IMO is yellow jasmine (jessamine), especially if the area is full of it as it
produces a fair amount of nectar.
Blooms in early spring and if no
other nectar sources are available the bees will suffer from it's toxicity. Young bees die off first and then larvae die in the comb.
A spring time problem during buildup.
I was talking to one of Alabama’s 3 apiary inspectors this Fall. He said that he had been called out to inspect several hive deaths in early 2018 that he diagnosed as yellow jasmine deaths. Said he had seen it only rarely in previous years. (He is actually retired, but still works with the Dept.). My memory is that he speculated there were just some early blooms of jasmine with nothing else competing for attention of the bees. Prior to that conversation, I had never really heard of that happening.
 
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