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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok,

So I'm not very constructed minded. I work in the IT field if that tells you much. I'm wondering what I can do to stabalize these 4x4 's on the blocks so they don't shift or roll over. Any comments welcome. You can click on the thumbnail for a larger picture.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What about sliding front to back off the block. That's what I'm mainly concerned about. Especially on the high end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Danno I would but that starts getting deep into a valley where moisture could get worse. Right now they are located in the middle of the ridge facing southeast. There would be a lot of shade further down also.

Thanks for the suggestion.
 

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Looks very nice but would not use that for holding hives. :lookout: 1. It limits the number of hives a beekeeper may want. 2. The hives are too high to work comfortably and with stability. 3. Drifting because of eventual closeness of hives. 4. Working one hive will transmit vibrations to the next hive... IMHO it would be better to sit each hive on a seperate set of cinder blocks, which would be sitting level in the soil at various positions. As tempting as it is to many beeks, using pressure treated wood may not be healthy for insects, esp. bees. OMTCW
 

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I agree with Cedar Hill. The hills I have my bees on aren't as steep as yours, but I put my hives on their own stands, leveled into the ground. Much more stable, and I can get around each one safely. Just think, if you have a good honey flow, how many supers will be on top of your downhill hive? Can you reach up that high? Assuming that would be a very pleasant problem to have!
Regards,
Steven
 

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The lay of my land is like that in your photo.

Can you move your stand to the top of the ridge and still have excess to them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The lay of my land is like that in your photo.

Can you move your stand to the top of the ridge and still have excess to them?
Yes but they would be next to the road. Plus the wind gets pretty gusty up there at times.
 

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Yes but they would be next to the road. Plus the wind gets pretty gusty up there at times.
I live on a dead road, so thru traffic and the resulting hoodlumism to hives at this time, should not a problem.

Also I have an old fence line along the road with some standing trees to serve as a wind break and shade in the afternoon.
 

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Turn your 4X4's 90 degrees. Instead of the stand looking like a ski slope, turn the the stand 90 degrees to follow the contour of the hill.

And if you need to, use a shovel to dig the back 4X4 deeper, instead of trying to prop up the front.
 

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I think I would drill some holes vert. in the end of the posts on the top side of the hill and drive at least a foot long piece of rebar down through the post into the ground to solve the potential sliding problem. Than cut and screw a 3/4 plywood deck on top of the post to add stability and a way to approch the hive from the high side. Dig in the cinder blocks first to make them level and secure.
Just my thoughts if that is the location that you have to work with @ this time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Turn your 4X4's 90 degrees. Instead of the stand looking like a ski slope, turn the the stand 90 degrees to follow the contour of the hill.

And if you need to, use a shovel to dig the back 4X4 deeper, instead of trying to prop up the front.
Then they would not get the East Sun and possibly get the North wind to the front.
 

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ok here is my in put take number 8 rebar pound it thru the center of each cinder block opening in to the ground 24 inches, when the rebar is just below the top of the cinder block take some redi mix fill up the blocks, then put in 5/8 anchor bolts in the wet cement drill the holes thru the boards let the cement cure 48 hours bolt on the boads it will stay just fine.
 

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I would secure the cinder blocks with the rebar as someone has stated. Even if you secure the BOARDS with rebar, the cinder blocks have the potential to slide out from under the boards. Also as someone said, cover the 4x4’s with something so you have something to stand on. I worked a hive from a step ladder once. Ya can’t fix stupid ;-)
Or, going back and looking at your pic, I would just use a shovel and dig out the high side and make a small area flat like maybe the length of the boards and 3 feet on ether side like they terrace rice fields on a mountain side.
 

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You got a lot of good suggestions here. I'll add my two cents.

I have some hives on a hill. I chose to run my hive stands 90 degrees from how you have yours set up. I dug back a little and set a concrete block for the back, then leveled one in the front...not too bad and I can get around the hive pretty well. I mostly work it from the back.

Now the bad news. When I take off the lid and set it on the ground, it usually stays put. If I pull off a super or hive body and set it on the lid, the lid wants to start sledding down the hill. I almost need a level stand just to set my other boxes on. Wished I had thought of that before setting this yard. So I end up setting the lid behind the hive where my best place to stand used to be.

I also don't like the way the mud makes climbing the hill extra difficult, and those heavy supers going up the hill make the walk an afternoon of great exercise. The slope won't let me pull my truck down there.

Hope this helps,

Grant
Jackson, MO
 

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get a few 2x4 stakes. place two on the outside of the blocks and one on either side of the blocks. Make sure the wood is treated and drive them about a foot in the ground. I wouldn't put more than three supers on. It should work fine. On the 4x4 end. Drill a hole and drive a piece of rebar through it. Good luck. Ric
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks guys. Hard to find a flat spot here in the foothills. I enjoy having them in my back yard so my little girl and I can watch them. I won't grow this stand much, but I am going to locate some about a mile down the road where it will be a little more level.
 
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