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Neonicotinoid Insecticides and Their Impacts on Bees: A Systematic Review of Research Approaches and Identification of Knowledge Gaps
It has been suggested that the widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides threatens bees, but research on this topic has been surrounded by controversy. In order to synthesize which research approaches have been used to examine the effect of neonicotinoids on bees and to identify knowledge gaps, we systematically reviewed research on this subject that was available on the Web of Science and PubMed in June 2015. Most of the 216 primary research studies were conducted in Europe or North America (82%), involved the neonicotinoid imidacloprid (78%), and concerned the western honey bee Apis mellifera (75%). Thus, little seems to be known about neonicotinoids and bees in areas outside Europe and North America. Furthermore, because there is considerable variation in ecological traits among bee taxa, studies on honey bees are not likely to fully predict impacts of neonicotinoids on other species. Studies on crops were dominated by seed-treated maize, oilseed rape (canola) and sunflower, whereas less is known about potential side effects on bees from the use of other application methods on insect pollinated fruit and vegetable crops, or on lawns and ornamental plants. Laboratory approaches were most common, and we suggest that their capability to infer real-world consequences are improved when combined with information from field studies about realistic exposures to neonicotinoids. Studies using field approaches often examined only bee exposure to neonicotinoids and more field studies are needed that measure impacts of exposure. Most studies measured effects on individual bees. We suggest that effects on the individual bee should be linked to both mechanisms at the sub-individual level and also to the consequences for the colony and wider bee populations. As bees are increasingly facing multiple interacting pressures future research needs to clarify the role of neonicotinoids in relative to other drivers of bee declines.
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0136928
 

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surrounded by controversy? Translate that as "Big Chemical" making smoke distracting us. There is no controversy here. Neonics are real bad for social insects period. No need to study that, its a fact.

No argument or controversy here and these aren't the droids you're looking for...move along.
 

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surrounded by controversy? Translate that as "Big Chemical" making smoke distracting us. There is no controversy here. Neonics are real bad for social insects period. No need to study that, its a fact.

No argument or controversy here and these aren't the droids you're looking for...move along.
Also big agriculture no need to use crop rotation any more to control pests just use more chemicals.
 

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betty, I'm about 40 min south of you, so I too am in the heart of neionics. I haven't lost one single colony due to neonics, and haven't heard one complaint from anyone in our club. how many have you lost? wouldn't one think that those of us here at ground zero would be loosing them left and right? if fact if my bees listened to the propaganda surrounding this subject they would just give up, but they aren't they are thriving, without treatments none the less. Maybe it's only a problem for those who treat? Maybe it's the straw that breaks the camels back after they have been exposed to miticides??? Either way, I would definitely say the jury is still out on this one.
 

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Read through most of this. It's basically a study of the studies. Conclusion? More studies are needed of course. :rolleyes:
 

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Happy to here that . But it is happening .

don't get me wrong, there are rare occasions when a field is too wet to get into and they miss the window for corn and have to double up on a later season bean crop, but it's not considered best practices anywhere that Im aware of. And around here, you can bet if that happens, that fall after they harvest the field will get tiled so it decreases the chance that it will happen again.
 

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don't get me wrong, there are rare occasions when a field is too wet to get into and they miss the window for corn and have to double up on a later season bean crop, but it's not considered best practices anywhere that Im aware of. And around here, you can bet if that happens, that fall after they harvest the field will get tiled so it decreases the chance that it will happen again.
Right next to me a big farm rented some land then he put corn in for many years . Then I sold my farm ,he planted corn right across the road from his and the differences in the color was astounding my old farm had deep green color while across the road it looked yellow
 

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Right next to me a big farm rented some land then he put corn in for many years . Then I sold my farm ,he planted corn right across the road from his and the differences in the color was astounding my old farm had deep green color while across the road it looked yellow
that guy was an idiot and hurting his yields big time, and his nitrogen bill was probably huge so he was loosing money on both ends. im sure he's not the only one either. Maybe he didn't have a bean head? LOL Either way, it's not considered best practices
 

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"There is no controversy here. Neonics are real bad for social insects period. No need to study that, its a fact."

A closed mind never questions, and never learns.
 

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Crop rotation is widely practiced here in Florida. Typical rotation is, Corn, peanuts, cotton, pasture, melons.
 

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Crop rotation is widely practiced here in Florida. Typical rotation is, Corn, peanuts, cotton, pasture, melons.
I wish they rotated that much here. Here is a typical rotation would be corn one year and beans the next. In the fields they are able to get the beans out early on, they double crop with winter wheat.
 

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betty, I'm about 40 min south of you, so I too am in the heart of neionics. I haven't lost one single colony due to neonics, and haven't heard one complaint from anyone in our club. how many have you lost? wouldn't one think that those of us here at ground zero would be loosing them left and right? if fact if my bees listened to the propaganda surrounding this subject they would just give up, but they aren't they are thriving, without treatments none the less. Maybe it's only a problem for those who treat? Maybe it's the straw that breaks the camels back after they have been exposed to miticides??? Either way, I would definitely say the jury is still out on this one.
Hold on buddy. The neonics is the seed coating and is getting powderized during planting. There is some type of fine powder lubricant the farmers use. Ever look close at a field at how the seeds are planted in a perfect grid?
Very hi-tech stuff that's over our heads but:

The seed coating and the lubricant drift at planting time and can destroy a colony of bees or at least all the field bees. Want to see pictures? Teach me how and I'll post some pics of piles of dead bees in front of an apiary that will make you sick. The propaganda is real during planting time. Bees are like little flying dustmops and they pick up the seed coating dust.

It affects the queens some say. Don't know just saying what the experienced people are telling me. I have a feeling that you know these people but not dropping names.

It's important that we discuss these things because it does affect our bees. How much? I do not know.
 

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Planter dust is the issue everyone should be focusing on, that actually is a problem. We use a different seed lubricant that reduces the dust blown residues.
When it's blown onto flowering trees aside from the field, to which the bees are foraging, it "supposingly" will kill bees just as they bring that pollen into the hives. I have not seen any piles of dead bees but my suspission is its long term effects on the queen.
 

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Hold on buddy. The neonics is the seed coating and is getting powderized during planting. There is some type of fine powder lubricant the farmers use. Ever look close at a field at how the seeds are planted in a perfect grid?
Very hi-tech stuff that's over our heads but:

The seed coating and the lubricant drift at planting time and can destroy a colony of bees or at least all the field bees. Want to see pictures? Teach me how and I'll post some pics of piles of dead bees in front of an apiary that will make you sick. The propaganda is real during planting time. Bees are like little flying dustmops and they pick up the seed coating dust.

It affects the queens some say. Don't know just saying what the experienced people are telling me. I have a feeling that you know these people but not dropping names.

It's important that we discuss these things because it does affect our bees. How much? I do not know.

nobody is talking about the dust. yes planting dust will kill bees ( whether it has a neionic coating or not) . Harvest dust will kill bees, pour organic flour in your hive it will kill bees. All of the research that they claim are killing bees is based of it being a systemic pesticide and the bees bringing it back in pollen or nectar. the only pesticide kills I'm aware of is when some idiot sprays his fruit trees while in bloom
 

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That leftist campain; 'we can not see it, or detect it, but we know it's there, and this is what it is, this is what it's doing and this is what we need to do... Because we know and we need to stop them'

Why focus on that unknown problem ? We need to focus on the issues that we have and can actually Fix?
The reason is they are not wanting to fix, the agenda is to eliminate
 

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That leftist campain; 'we can not see it, or detect it, but we know it's there, and this is what it is, this is what it's doing and this is what we need to do... Because we know and we need to stop them'

Why focus on that unknown problem ? We need to focus on the issues that we have and can actually Fix?
The reason is they are not wanting to fix, the agenda is to eliminate
Downright pithy. The elimination is indeed what the overarching goal is.

I'm always amazed how folks can state that it's a known "fact" but then can't show proof. Anything/one that disagrees with this is part of the smokescreen is part of "Big Ag." Then there is invariably the lamenting of others being so close minded to their "truth"...

Until there is scientifically repeatable proof, it's just another unsupported claim like all the other ones, not "truth."
 
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