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This is one for the moderator: is it acceptable (for greater visibility of post) to duplicate in both the Bee Forum and the Disease and Pests forum? I'm happy to abide by any policy, just need to know what it is.

If it's okay , I'll say that I could use some help with diagnosis of a diseased hive. I pulled out a sampling of brood and took photos and here's a link to photos on a Google Photos album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/51F8kHXGttzxVc649

I probably ought to find out who the current county inspector is and have her/him come out and take a look.

Does this look like foulbrood? On the surface , the hive looks healthy, excepting there are period where there are a lot of crawlers. Sugar rolls found no mites in two recent checks. No odor in brood. No melting down of larvae. No melting down of pupae, as described in symptoms of AFB. No discolored larvae that I've seen, but pupae can sometimes be a bit off white and I don't know when that starts with development of mature bees. Lots of pupae with tongues sticking out. Many bees looking normal when emerging but are crawlers (I've never really asked: how soon CAN bees fly after emerging?) Some almost formed but not yet emerged bees look wet/dark/greasy.
 

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Not sure what the rules about cross posting are but I doubt you will find that it gets an answer any faster.

There is a test for one of them efb maybe that you can buy. Also, if you suspect a disease you have a state bee inspector who will likely be happy to come out and help diagnose it. Remember, if your hive gets weak and fails other bees from other colonies will come and rob it, and bring it back to their colonies. These diseases are taken quite seriously. You should be able to google up the contact for your county bee inspector or at least your state one.
 

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Look at areas where there are color contrasts with ajacent larvae. The greyish ones are infected. Feed may be yellowish . Something like ribs appear darkish; probably air tubes, anyways different than in the pearly white uninfected larvae. Larvae slumped to bottom of cells. Look for areas where eggs and youngest larvae are interlaid with older or diseased cells. Ratio of eggs : larvae : capped should be in same ratios as days in each stage 3:6:12 if each stage is happening as it should. EFB larvae are kicking off mostly before capping. In a new case when plenty of nurse bees exist they get cleaned out at day 2 or 3 and initially you may not see the large discolored ones or dissolving and slumping to to a crusty heap in the bottom of the cell. As the disease progresses nurse bees are scarce and there is little feed in the cells and the capped brood is fewer and further between.

Hard to get good photos with a phone.
 

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Not a mod but if you post in multiple places,people won't get the whole picture and the benefit of groupsourcing and considering options of others when trying to solve the problem. Sounds very much like chronic bee paralysis. Do get a test kit to make sure it is not E F B which is also a possibility. I assume you must be thinking CBP also by your requeening question. If so, that proves my point about having your posts in one place. J
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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It is best not to post the same question in two separate threads. Pick the forum that best reflects the nature of the question and go from there. Same is true when having an ongoing discussion about a specific problem. It is hard to get a clear picture when the pertinant information is scattered across multiple threads.
 
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