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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2 hives, swarmed about 2-3 weeks ago, possible more than once. Lots of queen cells 2-3 weeks ago along with some possible afterswarms.

Today, still no sign of queen. Still lots of bees and LOTS of activity out front but they are completely broodless and are starting to fill up with honey. Today I did add one frame each of some eggs/larva from a double NUC I have that has a queen.

I'd like some input on my plan: Wait one more week+ then check for queen sign. If nothing, look really hard for a queen, if still nothing, buy two queens. I'd like to move the queenright NUC into a 10 frame as they are getting really strong. I would consider combining, but with how this spring has gone, I worry about something going wrong.

I would love to hear input on this. Thanks!
 

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I would see what they do with the frame of eggs you gave them. I suspect that there is probably queens in their they just haven't started laying yet. Especially if there was after swarms with the first couple queens to emerge that pushes back the laying by a day or 2. Check back in a week. If there are no queen cells being built on the added frame check for eggs. If there is still no sign of a queen or evidence of her laying maybe shake the hive through a queen excluder to make sure before adding a purchased queen or combining with queen right hives.
 

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I would see what they do with the frame of eggs you gave them.

That's fine, but the bees will tell you if they are queenless. They will make a lot of noise and wave their wings around demonstrating their distress. If they are calm and acting normal, give them another week and check again.
Adding a frame with healthy larvae is always a good thing to do when you are uncertain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So be patient is what I am getting. I think that is the wisdom I need. Being home a lot right now means lots of bee watching time which is great. But it also means it is more tempting to go in and have a look and make changes.

I'm doing better at logging what is going on so going forward I can see how many days it has been. Sometimes I think it has been weeks since I had a look then I check the log and it has been four days. Time has no meaning anymore.
 

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Patience is important. On hives that are going through requeening I write the next inspection date on the telescoping cover. That way there is little confusion and prevents me from interrupting them too soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Patience is important. On hives that are going through requeening I write the next inspection date on the telescoping cover. That way there is little confusion and prevents me from interrupting them too soon.
So in the future when I see say, capped queen cells. How long should I wait? I think my initial "bee math" was wrong and I got too jumpy too soon. I like the idea of writing the date on the lid.
 

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Patience is truly a virtue in beekeeping. I think you have a queen so wait and see what they do with the frame you provided. I have jumped the gun more than once and wound up with too many queens. A nectar bound hive is a challenge if you don't have drawn combs. I would remove and replace with foundation. They might start drawing with a laying queen. You can put the nectar frames back in the fall. If they don't draw,they may clear nectar to give the queen some room. J
 
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