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Discussion Starter #1
I do not need or want a list of honey recipes !

I need reference ideas where I can prepare a talk about the use of honey in the preparation of various food items, and nutrition, temperature limitations, etc., etc. The presentation will be to high end culinary students. The National Honey Board provides some basic information but I am looking for additional resources. All suggestions are welcome but I do not want recipes. Thanks in advance.

Steve
 

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"The Hive and the Honeybee" has an interesting and informative treatise on cooking with honey. It refers to 'The American Honey Institute" as "a source for dissemination of such materials" with regard to "a world of information and countless recipes".

ABC/XYZ also has an address under "Honey, cooking with".

Both are informative and contain specific information that, it would appear, high end culinary students should become acquainted with.
Relative sweetness, substituting - how much & what kinds for various applications, differing results ( vs cane sugar)... interesting & educational.

Good luck!
 

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Most people have no idea there are varietals and the most interesting point for foodies may be the last in this list. . A dark honey like Tallow or Buckwheat would be great in an oatmeal cookie whereas, I imagine Orange Blossom would make a fantastic glaze on poultry or fish. Alfalfa or Clover would allow someone to simply "cook with honey" without imparting much flavor.

Tips on Cooking with honey
1. As a general guide, when using honey recipes, use less of honey because it is almost twice as sweet as sugar. Replace one cup of sugar for half a cup of honey, and because honey is hygroscopic (meaning it attracts water) , reduce the amount of liquid in the recipe by 1/4 cup for each cup of honey added.

2. Give longer time for beating and more vigorous beating compared to sugar recipes, and when baking with honey.

3. Add 1/2 teaspoon baking soda for each cup of honey used. This will neutralize honey's acidity and help the food rise.

4. Reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees Fahrenheit. Honey batter becomes crisp and browns faster than sugar batter.

5. When using honey in jams, jellies, or candies, increase the cooking temperature just a bit to allow the extra liquid to evaporate.

6. The floral variety of the honey should be considered when cooking with honey since honey has the power to balance, enhance or impart some of its flavor to other foods.
 

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I know that there can be some funny things with consistency. My son loves to freeze it, then chew it while frozen. Crystalized honey can be manufactured by taking the temp down - basically put it in the fridge. The crunch can be nice. I know that you can cook at low temp for a long time to make a crystalized honey. Ditto on the flavors and colors of different honeys. Buckwheat and Tupelo is dramatically different in color and flavor than wildflower - to the point of being more like molasses than honey. Crystalized honey can be whipped into a different product in a way. It will burn. If set at room temp, it seems to absorb more moisture from the air than other sugars. It needs to be paired - it overpowers other foods easily. Usually with delicate food flavors, you need to use very little, or if sweetness is needed, you need to mix with a non flavored sugar.
 

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I'd also add that using honey in the comb opens up a whole new range of possibilities in the culinary world. We plate honey comb with cheese (typically brie) and raspberries and serve with a sliced baguette
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for all of the ideas, pointers, hints, etc. and I do have both ABC-XYX and The Hive and the Honeybee in my personal library. Together with the National Honey Board info I now have a good start on a series of dot points for a set of Power Point slides. But I'm still open to more ideas so please shoot me some more.

Thank you again. I knew that my Bee Bros would help me out !

Regards,
Steve
 

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Perhaps discussing the benefits of using a natural form of invert sugar relating to baking science (nutrition,shelf life of finished product, flavor, etc.) Culinary nutrition has also been very relevant in modern food trends , so discussing the health benefits of raw /unpasturized honey and its appropiate uses in a restaurant setting might also be a great bet. Using and featuring local/artisan small farm products and advertising them as such in ones restaurant establishment is also a great "gimmick" honey is easy to incorporate in this manner and has a wide variety of uses on the menu .
 
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