Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Asphalt rolled roofing applied to plywood with roofing sealant does not work for me. even when I am careful to applied the sealant close to the edges of the plywood the rain seems to feed back and the plywood rots. What can I do different on my horizontal hives?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,055 Posts
Sealing down the rolled roofing probably causes problems with moisture penetrating the ply from underneath. Heat from sun and moisture = rot . You might do better with shingles which can breathe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,655 Posts
rot is rot, a lid is a lid, things don't change if it's a long hive or a vertical hive
you don't see shingles/waterproof roofing on lang lids, but for some reason it happens from time to time with alt hives
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
Imo, there's a lot to be said for a telescopic cover - which then provides the equivalent of an all-round 'drip-edge' - assuming this could be incorporated into whatever style of hive you have. I've made dozens of these, mostly with aluminium sheet on top (ex. scrapped caravan (camper)), but also a handful using heavy-gauge PVC (ex. supermarket 'special offer' banners), which is far easier to work with - and which appear to be holding-up ok. I find that lifting the telescopic cover clear of the topmost box with 5-10mm blocks or battens is sufficient to allow any trapped moisture to escape.
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
As mentioned with aluminum, same can be done with tar-paper folded carefully to make the corners, so there are no cuts for water intrusion. You can form it to come down the sides and create an integral drip edge of sorts. The seal isn't 100% solid all the way down the sides, so presumably some moisture could escape from the sides. So far I've never had one rot, even though I usually make super cheap "migratory" type covers. I've also made a super pretty one with stainless flashing and cedar shake shingles that has held up beautifully, but after having to keep lifting that thing up and down all year I am starting to appreciate the very light migratory covers more :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
I used to use coroplast attached to a wooden frame. That worked ok, but eventually the areas where the coroplast was attached to the wood would rot due to the moisture that would get in there. That and they are so light that if any wind gets under them they blow off. And if you didn't get a good coating of paint UV would break it down quickly. But it was cheap. Now I have been using the plastic roofing panels with a slightly heavier frame. Still really light though. I still use some coroplast for nucs, but as they get really ratty I replace the lids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I made the hive roof for my Warre out of a piece of PVC soffit trim.


6668FBDC-E9DD-41E2-B3F4-6D424C9108E2_zpstngtolmk.jpg

Since I didn't use it all up on the Warre, I also made a flat telescoping cover for one of my Langstroths.

I glued it together using epoxy and pocket screws underneath. Its waterproof.

I don't know if that is what you were looking for, but its an idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
Earlier this evening I was reading-up on the development of the Gallup/Adair Long Hive, back in 1872. One of the materials they used to make roofs back then was ... wait for it ... paper !

Not just any old paper, of course, but roofing paper if possible - but if not, then thick brown paper as used to make potato or flour sacks. This was pasted onto the wooden roof structure, then given two coats of paint (white lead in those days). As Adair pointed out, paper neither shrinks, swells, cracks nor warps. Four years later, and those paper covered roofs were "as perfect as when made.". Extraordinary.
LJ
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top