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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any good tutorials on trap-outs? Don't even know if it's possible with an established hive?
Here is the situation. Roof top department store type building. There is a fake store front that has a pretty big hollow area in it. One 1" hole in it with a couple hundred bees bearding on the outside. We really don't want to do a cut out because of the cost of repair and we'd probably need a lift too.
Would it work to mount a one-way cone leading into a hive body with drawn comb and possibly a caged queen. With an exit on the other end of the hive so the bees could come and go from the new exit.
My skill level is beginner/medium. I've had bees for about 6 years and understand the basics.
Thank you for any help.
 

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Do you anyone in youir local club that has more experience extracting bees that you can ask for help or shadow for a day. The cone thing kinda works, but bees are pretty smart and they will eventually figure it out and go right through it both ways. Be-Escapes only work for a few days. They would only be attracted to the caged queen if their original hive went queenless, otherwise their allegiance is to her.
 

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A trap out is used to bring an established hive out of a structure. Yes it will work if you have time and patience. The building owner must also have time and patience since there will be a bait hive sitting for 60 to 90 days at the entrance to the original hive.
To do a trap out you will need to be able to access the fake store front, to plug up any holes that the bees can use as a new entrance/exit. The best plug material is silicon caulk, I have used a variety of things in the past and you have to use your imagination. A cone made out of number 8 hardware cloth works the best. The cones that I make are about 12" long with the big end 4 to 5 inches and the small end big enough for two drones to get out at the same time.
The bait hive should be installed with the entrance as close to the original hives entrance, not at the end of the cone. Install a frame of brood in the bait hive, be sure it has eggs in it so they can make a new queen. If you have a weak established hive that will also work.
Place you cone over the original entrance hole, fasten it good and seal all cracks that the bees can use for another entrance/exit. I actually fasten my cones to a small piece of plywood, about a foot square or cut to fit irregular shapes. Bees will start to leave the end of the cone to go and forage, when they return they are looking for the original hives entrance, they can smell it and see it but can not enter, after a few minutes of wandering around they will smell the frame of brood and go to investigate. Bees want to be flying and foraging, they will dump their load and go back out and have now established a new home in the bait hive. The bees did not orientate to the end of the cone when they left to go forage and will not be able to find it again.
You will definitely need to return the next day to be sure they have not found another way in/out of the original hive, even check inside of the building.
After the first three or four days things will start to settle down since most of the foragers are now going into the bait hive. Just remember that the queen did not quit laying eggs the day you installed the cone. It will take 21 days for those bees to emerge and then all of the other eggs the queen has laid. This is where the patience par comes into play. Can take up to 60 days for the bees in the original hive to start to figure out that things are not going right, all of the foragers that do go out are not returning home. The population is starting to dwindle at this time and soon enough what bees and the queen will abscond to parts unknown. They will not enter into the bait hive since by now they will have a new laying queen in place.
To finish the trap out remove the cone and watch the bees that enter into the hive, this might be the next day. If they are bringing pollen into the original hive then you have not waited long enough. Replace the cone and give them more time. If bees are going in and coming out they might be robbing what honey is left inside. Remember no pollen is to go inside the original hive.
 

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If this is a paying job I figure
1. A minimum of 6 to 8 trips to the site.
2. Lift or scaffolding rental (plus pick up and return time, plus set up and tear down time)
3. Caulking or other materials to plug holes or make repairs.
4. What times can you access the site.
5. If this is a business, especially a chain store, they might require insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A trap out is used to bring an established hive out of a structure. Yes it will work if you have time and patience. The building owner must also have time and patience since there will be a bait hive sitting for 60 to 90 days at the entrance to the original hive.
To do a trap out you will need to be able to access the fake store front, to plug up any holes that the bees can use as a new entrance/exit. The best plug material is silicon caulk, I have used a variety of things in the past and you have to use your imagination. A cone made out of number 8 hardware cloth works the best. The cones that I make are about 12" long with the big end 4 to 5 inches and the small end big enough for two drones to get out at the same time.
The bait hive should be installed with the entrance as close to the original hives entrance, not at the end of the cone. Install a frame of brood in the bait hive, be sure it has eggs in it so they can make a new queen. If you have a weak established hive that will also work.
Place you cone over the original entrance hole, fasten it good and seal all cracks that the bees can use for another entrance/exit. I actually fasten my cones to a small piece of plywood, about a foot square or cut to fit irregular shapes. Bees will start to leave the end of the cone to go and forage, when they return they are looking for the original hives entrance, they can smell it and see it but can not enter, after a few minutes of wandering around they will smell the frame of brood and go to investigate. Bees want to be flying and foraging, they will dump their load and go back out and have now established a new home in the bait hive. The bees did not orientate to the end of the cone when they left to go forage and will not be able to find it again.
You will definitely need to return the next day to be sure they have not found another way in/out of the original hive, even check inside of the building.
After the first three or four days things will start to settle down since most of the foragers are now going into the bait hive. Just remember that the queen did not quit laying eggs the day you installed the cone. It will take 21 days for those bees to emerge and then all of the other eggs the queen has laid. This is where the patience par comes into play. Can take up to 60 days for the bees in the original hive to start to figure out that things are not going right, all of the foragers that do go out are not returning home. The population is starting to dwindle at this time and soon enough what bees and the queen will abscond to parts unknown. They will not enter into the bait hive since by now they will have a new laying queen in place.
To finish the trap out remove the cone and watch the bees that enter into the hive, this might be the next day. If they are bringing pollen into the original hive then you have not waited long enough. Replace the cone and give them more time. If bees are going in and coming out they might be robbing what honey is left inside. Remember no pollen is to go inside the original hive.
Awesome reply!
Thank you very much!
 

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Anything is possible;)) Do a search for Cleo Hogan trap out instructions..I would add to G3farms,, depending on how in front the store front is (what is the height of entrance?)) It will be a lot of bees in chaos, & you will need to support the hive on the entrance somehow..Trap outs are labor/time intensive & the problem may be reoccurring down the line, even if it is successful. You good at climbing ladders at least twice a week?, if no scaffolding or lift set up? Got pictures? How long have they been in the cavity?
 
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