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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I have two hives and I have been watching them. 4 days ago found swarm cells. So I hunted down the queens and pulled them, frame of brood, 3 frames of honey and move them to nucs. I just looked and the one nuc has capped queen cells (I found the queen). The interesting part is that the frame I found the cap queen cells was newly drawn out frames... On these frames there are all open cells not honey nothing BUT 2 cap queen cells. Two are in the middle of the frame one at the bottom. Why would the queen not lay in any of those other new cells? Is she going to swarm or do I have a failing queen? Also last night I was out watching the bees and I heard a high pitch buzz coming from that nuc... It was LOAD and not like anything I have heard before. Any ideas suggestions?
 

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Someone who is knowledgeable will probably chime in, but my (limited) guess would be that she's a failing queen and that's why they're making supersedure cells.
 

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I'm a bit confused by your description. Could you perhaps number the hives, and pose the questions regarding each. It sounds like the nuc with the open cells, & queen, but no brood is trying to supercede a failing queen. Swarm prep is another possibility. How did the brood pattern look? (in both of the originals)

Did you find swarm cells in both of the original Hives? Splitting the queens out into nucs was OK - both of those original hives have a chance of rearing a new queen from cells you left, if I understand correctly.

The high pitch sound was likely a queen "piping", which is a sound they make to announce themselves to other queens. 'Sounds like a very loud mosquito in your ear? That's neat!

Again, if I understand correctly, you've done most everything as "right" as need be. A little more specific info might help.
 

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How many cells did you find in the hives originally. People put too much emphasis on referring to queencells as either 'swarm' or 'supercedure'. Placement on comb has little to do with it, that is more about the hive dynamics at the time. Quantity of cells is a better indicator generally, the more cells, the more likely it's swarm prep.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I talked to a local bee keep the one that sold me the bees. Figuring out the time from the split to the time of cap cells he thinks its very likly that they were in the process of making queens on those frames before I moved that queen and those frames out. I am going to wait and see on this one... the bee population smaller and they may not swarm or this could be a supercede. Time will tell.
 
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