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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I need some serious insight and advice regarding storing brood frames. Since fall, I have lost about 60 brood frames. Let me explain and hopefully someone will be kind enough to help.

Ok, first of course, the wax moths were destroying them, even if I froze them before storing. So I made a spray using BT and applied it. After a few weeks I needed frames and found that they were destroyed by wax moths. Of course I’m pissed at this point, and then found out I used the wrong BT, so there went 30 frames.
So I buy Xentari, based on people’s recommendation. I followed the instructions, provided by people who have used it with success, including how they then stored the treated frames.
Fast forward a few months until now. I opened up the storage boxes and all of them are completely moldy, nasty and unusable.
So that is 60 frames of drawn brood comb ruined and now I just have foundation for the nuc’s I have ordered, no more drawn comb for brood.
It seems that many people have success storing brood comb all winter without wax moth or mold problems.
Does anyone have a method they have used numerous times without problem?

I am at a loss and would love some solid advice.
Thank you,
Damien
 

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Freeze your frames for 3 to 4 days. Remove let air dry a few hrs until no moisture, the seal in a plastic garbage bag. Works for me.
Good luck
 

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the mold was probably from putting them up wet with the bt spray. they need to be dry if you are going to put them in air tight storage boxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will try to let them dry before sealing them in a box. I was concerned about that because the BT has a short active life but I don’t have many options.
 

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I freeze 'em for a few days - you do need a freezer with a really low temperature for this - and then either store them in the workshop inside a vented defunct commercial chest freezer, or indoors in an unheated utility room within stacked brood boxes with a cotton dust sheet draped over them. I still get one or two cases of pollen mite activity, but no wax moths or grey mould.
LJ
 

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I was concerned about that because the BT has a short active life ...
i'm not sure about that. i use bt aizawai on the brood frames i put in my swarm traps and one treatment keeps them free from wax moth damage for a couple of months or longer.

really, they don't need to go into a sealed box once treated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I can’t put them back on top of hives over winter, too much space will kill my bees trying to keep the brood and themselves warm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just assumed once treated they needed to be stored in a sealed contained, I will try to store some in boxes that are not sealed.
 
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