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I have a client who has a swarm of bees inside a cinder block wall. They probably arrived in the last week. They are within 30" of the top of the wall and entering through some type of vent holes created by not mortaring between the brick facing and cinder blocks. The blocks are 12" wide. The thought is to open the top of the wall and place a hive with good comb above the hive. From what I've heard, the bees will find their way to the good comb, and that should include the queen. Can any of you advise experience with such a method? How long did it take for the transfer to take place? If this does not work, and with the client unwilling to open the wall, is there another way other than a trap out (which is too dangerous due to height of the building)? WJP
 

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Last year I got a call about a swarm that had moved into a hollow oak tree just a few hours earlier. I put a nuc box with drawn brood comb in it so that the entrance faced the hole in the tree and used towels and tape to make sure bees couldn't sneak in the sides. I then cracked open the lid on the far end of the nuc so that in order for bees to get into or out of the tree they had to go thru the nuc and smell all that nice drawn comb. This worked, within a few hours it had lured the entire colony into the nuc.

I don't know if this would work in your situation, particularly if they've had time to draw some comb and have the queen lay eggs. Hard to get them to leave their babies.
 

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For my $.02; check out posts by Cleo Hogan and Patbeek for visuals on your best options with trap outs. You might reiterate to the owner that leaving all the hive "debris" in the wall may cause numerous other problems, particularly as things warm this summer.
 
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