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I have two 8 frame hives, that I would like to make a nuc from each.

I have two 5 frame nuc boxes and I have access to two new queens from a reputable local breeder.

What I would like to do is make a nuc from each hive and then introduce a new queen to the 8 frame hives. Each 8 frame is two double deeps, with 16 drawn frames from 2018. My thought was to pull 3 frames from each hive, and add two frames ( just foundation ) to the nucs. Each nuc gets the overwintered queen. Replace the frames that I took from the 8 frames with new foundation frames. Wait 24 hours, and add the local queen ( in her cage ) to the 8 frame hive for them to release.

Is it that easy? It seems the more I research the more complicated it started to seem.

Looking for your advice and thank you.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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If you are putting the old queens in the nucs, why not just let each hive make their own queens? If you put the nucs in the old hive locations, you have a flyback split. Futher, once the qcs are capped in the old hive, you could make several more splits. Worked well for me last year. One hive became 2 hives and 4 nucs.
 

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In less than 24 hours the queenless hives will start queen cells. You'll have multiple possible outcomes at this point, few of which are great for your newly purchased queens. The bees may reject the purchased queen since they have queen cells, or they may accept her but because of the new queen cells she swarms off with half the bees in 10 days. You could destroy the queen cells, but what if you missed one or more? Maybe you'll get super lucky and they accept her and tear down the queen cells they started. But being super lucky is rare for me.

If you intend to introduce a new queen in a split then make a broodless split, also called a shook swarm. My suggestion is to isolate the queen and either cage her or put her frame in a quiet box. Put four frames of drawn comb, honey, pollen, but absolutely no brood, plus a frame of foundation into the nuc. Make sure there is at least one frame of honey, and a fair bit of pollen, if not then put a feeder on. Shake half the bees into the nuc. Now replace missing frames in the mother hive, put the queen back in the mother hive, and move the mother hive with the queen to a new location. Put the queenless and broodless nuc where the mother hive was. Foragers will return to the nuc, boosting its population. You can probably introduce the new queen about 12 hours later in her cage. As soon as she is released then transfer a frame of capped brood from the mother hive to where the foundation frame was in the nuc.

They won't be in the nuc for long, you'll be transferring them to an 8 frame deep in no time, so you should have more 8 frame hives ready to go. One option you have with an 8 frame deep box is that you can drop in a double wide frame feeder and viola, you have a 6 frame nuc & feeder. It is something to think about if you want to just skip the 5 frame nuc.
 

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"Is it that easy? It seems the more I research the more complicated it started to seem"..

Haveuseen, yes it can be easy depending upon what you hope to attain through the split. You said you wanted to simply make (2) new 5 frame nucs so I would do it the easy way without trying to re-invent the wheel. Variables can affect much of the outcome. Try doing your splits in favorable conditions: a nectar flow. Remove 2 frames of brood each from the parent 8 frame donor colonies. Along with the brood take a good frame of honey stores and visible pollen. Depending on how strong your donor colonies are I would also remove a frame of comb with partial stores if available. Leave the existing queens with the parent colony. Replace the frames you stole with waxed foundation if that's all you have. If there is a flow the parent colony is better suited to draw the foundation out as they are much stronger than the nucs. Take the two splits to another location a couple miles away (you can always move them back in a week or so. When your making up your splits check the brood frames you stole and knock down any and all queen cups. Introduce your new queen to the nucs using the Vanderpool method described on here numerous times. Just do exactly as he points out. I always feed the splits one round of a quart of syrup and "leave them alone". It has been pointed out on here many times by experienced beekeepers that expecting a newly made split to rear a productive queen can be a crap shoot. Emergency queens are not best management practices unless there is no alternative. Your newly made splits "should" release and accept their new queen without issue, as they are a small unit with mostly nurse bees. Your donor colonies should also rebound pretty quick. Good luck.
 

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Is it that easy? It seems the more I research the more complicated it started to seem.
It really is that easy, but I wouldn't wait 24 hours to put the new caged queen in place, bees will realize they are queenless in short order, and you should get the new caged queen in the colony before they have cells well underway.

Everything else you read about splits are details around trying to do things more efficiently or for targetting a specific outcome. If the only goal is to end up with 4 colonies from the original two, it really can be as simple as what you describe.

I have done many spring splits by doing essentially the same thing. I take 2 frames of brood and a frame of stores into the nuc box with the existing queen, then usually shake more bees off of another couple frames as we are not moving our splits to another yard, expect the forages in those boxes to return to the donor colony. As soon as we are done taking off the splits, I start back at the beginning of the line and put the new queens into the donor colonies. In our case, the new queens were caged out of mating nucs just before we started splitting the full size colonies. All of the other minutia around various split strategies and methods are about optimizing the situation for a specific outcome.
 
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