Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a completely unexpected chain of events, I am relocating from north central New Jersey to Sarasota, Florida. I have been beekeeping for five years, love it, and am devastated at the notion of upending my (meager, four-hive) bee yard. I need a quick answer to one question, and also an answer for a longer-term question.

First, I have these four healthy and producing hives, of varying box-heights and strengths, that I need to remove between now and late August. I am informed by The Authorities (my wife) that the hives can't make the move with us to Florida (they'd probably cook on the summer trip through the South, anyway), but more on that later. How does one go about finding a foster bk? I understand that other bks are reluctant to take on colonies in this situation, given the risk of mites, AFB, etc. (tho the same people are happy to catch and adopt swarms in the equivalent of shacking up with an unknown partner). There is no strong bee club in my area, and I am talking with the local Green Acres societies about taking them on, but still...

Second, once I get established in Southwest Florida, I may want to get back into the hobby. I will need to research state law in Florida on the topic, and I expect that, with AHB infiltration, it may be different than in New Jersey. Any input regarding between differences in beekeeping in the two locales?

Thoughts on either topic very much appreciated. Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
If your ultimate goal is to find a beekeeper willing to care for your bees until winter, when you can safely transport them to Sarasota, you may not have that much trouble. I am not terribly far off I-95 but am probably still too far north. Ideally, you could find someone about halfway so that you could drop them off on the first day and have a two day round trip to pick them back up. Maybe one of the folks in NC or SC could offer their services.

About the only thing I am aware of is the requirement to re-queen swarms with a purchased queen. Same for splits, no home grown queens. Not sure how anyone would be able to tell as long as the hives are docile. Hives must be inspected before being allowed into the state. There is an agricultural inspection station on I-95 just a mile or two past the state line coming in. If you are transporting bees, you are required to stop.
 

·
Registered
5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
Joined
·
2,529 Posts
unless you have an emotional connection to "your bees" one could sell them, move , settle, then start with new bees.
I would take some old combs and traps and trap some swarms, I have heard in Fla there is a fair amount of swarms depending on the locale. Then you have local bees, and the move is not bothering your plans and schedule.

GG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
unless you have an emotional connection to "your bees" one could sell them, move , settle, then start with new bees.
I would take some old combs and traps and trap some swarms, I have heard in Fla there is a fair amount of swarms depending on the locale. Then you have local bees, and the move is not bothering your plans and schedule.

GG
Goose is exactly right. Catching swarms is easy here. You would need to get swarm traps out early in south Florida. One other possibility is purchasing bees returning from the almonds. Those are cheap compared to northern bees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,017 Posts
In any case, you'd want Southern bees in the South (vs. the Northern bees in the North).
Moving the bees even from this perspective makes little sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
Scrambles - a few questions:

How long have you had these particular bees?
Are you expecting the new owner to provide their own equipment. If not what equipment will be coming with the bees?
How big are the hives (# boxes and sizes)?
Have they been treated for mites on a regular basis?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
Sell them. I bought 6 hives last year from someone who was moving South, and it worked well for both him and me. I think the fear of buying used hives and bees is greater than the actual danger, if the buyer is careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
My daughter is president of the Princeton University Bee club unfortunately they lost their hives over winter and haven been able to start back up in the spring due to covid. Not sure how close they are to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
My daughter is president of the Princeton University Bee club unfortunately they lost their hives over winter and haven been able to start back up in the spring due to covid. Not sure how close they are to you.
They are about 1 hour from the poster.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top