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Discussion Starter #1
Due to Rain in Texas My Bee package cant ship for another 2 weeks. (end of May) That means my bees will not be able to make enough Honey to get them through the very cold North East winters. ...Should I buy some real bee keeper Honey and feed it to them when they arrive...? or even in the Fall..? If I do this when thay arrive I think they'll be able to fast track and draw comb and rear enough brood to them get enough Honey for winter. But I'm really not sure at all. I just dont want to loose my new late arriveing package and colony ..................BTB................thanks
 

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Feeding honey usually puts them in survival mode-- for bees means less laying from the queen and smaller numbers. Think of how bees eat honey during winter and nectar during the foraging months.

Now I am all about being natural and have fed honey quite a bit, but to get them ready for the fall nectar flow I would feed the 1:1.
 

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My first bees did not arrive until the end of May. When they came they got down to work and most were double deeps by fall. Some gave us excess honey to extract. I gave them sugar bricks over winter and they all came through.
You are about to have so much fun!
 

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They'll make it. Feed them 1:1, which is best for building comb, better than honey. If the queens get accepted and start laying, you'll be surprised how quick they'll build up.
 

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Feed them on arrival, and plan on feeding them again in the Fall to get them up to good winter weight, which might be a colony weight of more than 120 lbs.

I am far north of you (north of Albany, NY) and my bees (all cut-out swarms) were hived on the 23rd of June. I didn't know that I could have/should have fed them initially because I didn't discover BeeSource until later. I fed them in the Fall, and provided them with supplemental food during their first winter (Lauri Miller's fabulous Sugar Brick recipe). They all survived, thrived, and are still with me, now coming into their third summer.

You bees will be fine with what you can give them. They need that supplement when they arrive to get them fueled to draw the comb they need to start their babies and store their pollen and nectar. NE PA isn't like it is in the far South when a summer dearth invariably hits. There will still be good foraging opportunties until nearly Columbus Day. (But still plan on feediing them again in September until they won't take any more, or they reach winter weight for your area.)

Look at it this way: late hiving means that you won't have as much risk for chilled brood in the early weeks. It will be warmer, and more settled, and your bees will BOOM!

Enj.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all so much. Thank you all for replying. I will take your advice and encouragement. I was so very upset and really bummed out. Now I have hope and sound advice. This is the best Bee site and Community Ever. BTB. : )
 
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