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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone I have a question. I found these little honey bees in our clover patch. They are about half the size of domestic honey bees. They were foraging right along with my "girls". They look very similar to domestic honey bees just smaller and less fuzzy. They had their little pollen baskets all full! I live in Ontario Canada and have my whole life but have never seen them before. Any ideals?
 

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First of all honey bees are not indigenous to North America or South AmericaI really can't tell by your picture if it's a honey bee or not it. Definitely a pollinating insect there are about 20,000 species of pollinging in in North America.



BEE HAPPY Jim 134 :)
 

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LIke jim said honey bees are not native to americas. Looks like a solitary bee, mason bee. There abdomens are flat, squarish. And their antenna are a bit different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I didn't know that there were no native honey bees. There were lots of them all going from clover to clover same as my girls were, so just thought they were a type of honey bee especially when I seen they had pollen baskets on their legs and were full. So I don't think it's a type of solitary bee unless there were just a few foraging at the same time. Hmmm interesting I wonder if I can get better pics, just thought it was so neat I didn't realize that other bees besides honey bees collected pollen like that.
 

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Honey bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees, solitary bees are all hairy and collect pollen.

The pictures you took arn't the greatest, they could very well be honey bees from your hive, feral hives or kept hives within a mile or two.
 

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When frames get older, cells get smaller, and so do workers who grow in them. The difference can be quite significant. This may very well be what you are observing. Otherwise, could be just about any kind of bee. The Americas had one native honey bee, fossils suggest, but it's been long extinct. All of our current honey bees are imported from the Old World.
 

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leaf cutters is a definite posibility. They gather pollen for their nests and are still active this time of year, and they look very similar to honey bees (1/2 size)to the casual observer. Mason bees, not likely. Both blue and red mason bees are pretty much done for the season and don't look anything like a honeybee.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>This is slightly off topic, but I thought honeybees had difficulty working red clover?

That's not a honey bee. I can't tell for sure if that's red clover. There are 245 species of true clovers (Trifolium) that run from purple to red to crimson. As far as I know, only the red (Trifolium pretense) is an issue for honey bees.
 
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