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Anyone know who authors the Colony, Honey plant and market conditions each month for the New England and the New York regions?
 

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Anyone know who authors the Colony, Honey plant and market conditions each month for the New England and the New York regions?
I don't know but whomever does the NY report isn't to chatty. I just went and looked at the former club in Mass. I belonged to, I would say the new england write up is pretty accurate.

Does appear they had the best flows in 20 years, but even people that treated, saw a large influx of mites in Oct. and apparently the queens had shut down by Oct 15, where they normally go until mid Dec. so they are seeing higher than normal losses, even with the people that treat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I too had high mites in early Autumn; I don’t have m6 hives set up the proper way, hopefully this year. No losses yet but it’s early. 20 hives. It’s not Cornell/Scot McArt? Maybe ask Emma @ Cornell? Or Pat Bono.
 

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The way I see it from here:
Long, warm fall through Sept, Oct, first 2 weeks of Nov. Finally below normal temps (20f below norm) for a week in mid Nov. Seasonal temps late Nov, then colder than norm and 2 weeks of wet into 3 week of Dec. Couldn't design a more stressful fall for the bees, after a heavy summer honey crop and fall days & nights to warm for much grod harvest up until the temps fell out in mid Nov. (Very thankful for asters.)

Mite influxes from walking dead hives all fall (big colonies collect record honey crops=lots of mites), most of the terminally sick finally kicked during the Nov cold snap. Damage done to other colonies though.
Some yards many dead out, many other yards not a loss. Losses seem very concentrated, reasons look to be mite viruses and some queen loss.
Dead outs now are small clusters with queen that lack critical mass.

Very few starve outs but some of the living will need attention in early March, weather dependent.
Some hives going into and through winter with smaller than normal winter clusters and probably compromised winter bees. Might see lots of 5 framers at maple that need patties and dry sub feeders filled.

Sure, treated bees suffer too.

Just hung out my "Replacement Bees For Sale" shingle this past weekend.
 
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