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If Nanotechnology is able to make a bee or something like a bee what will happen to the pollinators? They are already trying to use bumble bees, etc so what happens to the honey bee?
Would like to know your thoughts and any information on progress of bee technology.
Oh it is coming if we like it or not. I have been watching this for about five years and they are very close. The only thing is the cost that is keeping it from being implemented already.

The Science fair winner about four years ago was a scale size humming bird with a color camera and could record your conversation, that was four long years ago. It was remote controlled and a very close exact drone it you will.

Any info would be great and pictures and links would even be better.

Thoughts on where honey would be in the world if they didn't use bees as much, prices go up, etc?

Thank you for your time and hope you have a great 2014.
 

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I thought the battery life of the RoboBees was still very short, but isn't that what they said about the EV1 !!!

You're probably get some weird thoughts from the nonExistentialists on here, but
I would guess we won't be raising european bees in the future, and that honey crops will
be far less.

I want to guess that maybe apis cerana japonica could be trained to attack the RoboBees, and
then being a beekeeper will be only more fun!

Happy 2014
 

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Monsanto could work on a nanomite and sell treatments to combat it.
 

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I think that the technology is interesting. Nanotechnology is being used to do a lot of good things already in areas such as cancer treatment with rising success. I think though, since it is fairly new technology, people are somewhat fearful of it. Media companies use this fear to create far fetched stories and generate income. Many of the experiments that occur, such as the hummingbird, are nothing more than demonstrations to show what CAN be done with the technology, rather than what WILL be done with it. More or less a marketing technique. It will not be feasible to create nano-bees for pollination and making honey. Not to mention the fact that making honey is a biological process accomplished with tissue, organs,pheromones, and all sorts of enzymes that only pertain to an organic life form such as the honeybee. It's also not only cost prohibitive, but extremely out of reach as far as demand is concerned. Think about it, a strong hive has about 60,000 unique bees on average. Multiply that times the 2.5 million colonies in the U.S. , and you will see that 150 billion individual nano bees will have to be produced to reflect current numbers. Even if that many could be produced, they would then need programming to pollinate certain flowers, and then use nectar to make honey. The idea will fail before it comes out of the box. There is a huge demand for honey and there always will be as long as people know it exists. If supply was larger and prices cheaper, it would replace sugar cane demand. But, that's just my opinion. I have been proven wrong plenty times before.
 

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Yep, I'm not too worried about these little nano-gadgets supplanting bees. Honey, beeswax; on a much smaller scale propolis - these are things the gadgets just can't do. Not to mention the cost of a few hundred thousand of those little robots has got to be staggering next to a phalanx of bee hives.
 

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Here is the article that the photo in post #8 was copied from:
http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2013/05/robotic-insects-make-first-controlled-flight

Note that these flying robots require a power cable. :eek:

The prototypes are still tethered by a very thin power cable because there are no off-the-shelf solutions for energy storage that are small enough to be mounted on the robot's body. High energy-density fuel cells must be developed before the RoboBees will be able to fly with much independence.

http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news/2013/05/robotic-insects-make-first-controlled-flight
 

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robo bees would be for pollination only and they wouldn't need a 'hive'. Just think how many would be destroyed though by nature and malfunction, it's totally unfeasible unless you start talking self replication.
 

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Yep, I'm not too worried about these little nano-gadgets supplanting bees. Honey, beeswax; on a much smaller scale propolis - these are things the gadgets just can't do. Not to mention the cost of a few hundred thousand of those little robots has got to be staggering next to a phalanx of bee hives.
Not if the nanobees can reproduce themselves.
 
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