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Discussion Starter #1
Since im new to this beekeeping thing Im looking at making all my own parts. I have some commerially made frames and the top bar seem to be made out of a plywood/veneer - is the reason for this because of cost or strength??

What type of plywood do they use??
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>I have some commerially made frames and the top bar seem to be made out of a plywood/veneer

Who did you buy them from? I've never seen any that weren't solid pine except 30 years ago I used to see some fir.

> - is the reason for this because of cost or strength??

Both, would be my guess. If could be stronger and probably cheaper.

In order to be stronger it would need to be laminated with all the grain running lengthways, at least on the top and bottom bars. The ends could use a cross lamination to hold the spacer "ears" on.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>All my "new" frames are leftovers from my grandfather 20 years ago

Now I feel old! Some of my newer frames are from 20 years ago, my old ones are from 30 years ago and they were bought new by ME, not my grandfather.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
LOL..... You guys are a hoot.... thanks...
Not sure who made them - they came with the observation hive I bought off ebay...
 

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My husband enjoys carpentry and occasionally makes furniture. He's not entirely convinced that it would be cheaper to amke it than to buy it? We live in Ohio, maybe if we bought pine while we are visiting NC? What say you, guys and gals? Is it cheaper to buy them or make them?
 

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I make my lids from old plywood or pressboard. I make my screen bottom boards from used oak/hickory, as well as my entrance reducers. I buy plastic frames, and I find it's cheaper to buy the boxes than make them.
 

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Maybe the MOST important consideration to answer the question is "How much is your time worth?" Sometimes you CAN make something yourself and do it cheaper or for about the same money as buying it... BUT, the bought stuff is usually cut more acurately (by automated machines set up to make 1000's of the same cut), will look better than homemade(not always), and you did not spend days or weeks cutting and making woodenware yourself. I know all this becuz I just built 100 bottoms/deeps/and tops. Yep.. cost me about 1/2 of the cheapest budget store bought stuff you can find (~10-12.00 per hive) BUT... I spent MANY hours building them and almost lost a finger in a tablesaw cuz I got in a hurry. Noone can tell you what to do... but your Husband ain't ALL wrong... : )))
 

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Well I have been making all my own execpt frames and it is cheaper but.....I ran my left hand through the tablesaw with a dado blade on......yep in a hurry and taking shortcuts......been two weeks now and it will be many more before my fingers on my left hand are normal again and maybe never will......Now I know you all say "but I'm carefull and it will never happen to me" I said it too and unless you follow every safty to the last detail, EVERY LAST DETAIL, your saw will catch up with you......it did me and I am paying the price for it.......I guess my point is if you make your own equipment please be very carefull because it happens faster than you can blink.....you don't know how much you take for granted until you loose the use of your fingers....can't even tie my own shoes now.......

Wayne
 

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I was going to make some frames based on Dadant design. By the time I purchased 1 2x4 to be ripped into parts, I decided to purchase frames. I am going to foundationless, however. So after I use the purchased frames and all my foundation, I will be making "straight-sided" frames (no fancy tapers to the side bars) and spacing them myself.

WayaCoyote
 

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>Now I know you all say "but I'm carefull and it will never happen to me" I said it too and unless you follow every safty to the last detail, EVERY LAST DETAIL, your saw will catch up with you......it did me and I am paying the price for it...

I worked with an old carpenter/cabinet maker who started when he was 16 and when I knew him he was in his 60's. He had never been cut on a saw but one night, working late he wasn't thinking for a split second and ran his thumb through a table saw. The only thing that saved his thumb is he WAS following the saftey rule that you only have the saw blade as high as you need it to go through the wood. He regained the use of his thumb but it took a long time and it was always sore and stiff.

It only takes a second.
 

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I was working in a cabinet factory when right out of college. A coworker who had been hired as a "helper" showed how much experience he had with power tools when he tried to touch the pretty spinning blade on the molding machine. I was promoted to a machinist. He stayed a helper.
 
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