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I have a hive started from package bees in April. I had an initial problem with it and determined there was no queen in the hive, for some reason. I requeened, fed the bees regularly and gave them pollen patties. They were in a hive with mostly drawn comb from previous years.
The hive has looked sluggish all along. Today I opened it and found a reasonable population of bees, mostly in the lower super. They have stored virtually no honey, pollen and almost no brood. I saw the queen, walking around but not laying.
The hive has no sign of disease and it has been treated for mites. Earlier in the season, I often saw pollen going into this hive.

Any idea why this hive is simply not productive and certainly is going to die without intervention?
I have one other hive that's going gangbusters, 25 feet away. I can see that it has a good honey crop.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Scottbri, welcome to Beesource. Please edit your profile to include your location so that the appropriate advice can be given. As to your question, have you been feeding all along or did you stop once the package bees got going? Was the queen you purchased marked and are you sure it is the same one? Many things can make a hive appear to be lethargic as we transition to fall. Summer dearth slowdown, swarms, excessive heat, etc. Or, the queen could be a poor layer. Until you let us know where you are, any recommendations would be generic and not necessarily suitable.
 

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First, heed JWPalmer's advice above.

I would newspaper-combine a strong, over-Wintered nucleus colony, and start swapping out the old combs for new foundation wax (right next to open brood) one at a time.

Package bees are not natural, the bees in it are not necessarily related to one another, and often take considerable time getting started. The main Spring nectar / pollen flow is just about over when they figure things out. Furthermore, their population is low, and the prime Spring flow needs a high population to harvest a fine crop of hive products. The division of labor HIGHLY FAVORS larger populations early in the Spring. Package bees often drag when they need to be hopping to it.

Dr. Lawrence John Conner showed how poor a choice package bees are and the reasons for it in his book, Increase Essentials. Understanding the math and the graphs in this book and putting it to practice can graduate one from beginning beekeeper to intermediate.

This late in the year, such a package colony needs the boost from the young colony, and it is now close to too late in the year for the package colony to recover without help.

Roland, a 5th-generation beekeeper who occasionally posts on this forum, has kept data showing that older combs are probably poisoned or treated to the point that the bees don't populate up as well as they do in new wax. A sign of our times and methods of farming, and not a good practice for the bees.

Feed them MegaBee pollen substitute patties, and ProSweet liquid feed to see if they can get things going a bit better before Winter. Best of luck.
 
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