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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, my first-year hive swarmed about 3 weeks ago. I did an inspection a week later to see if the virgin queen had emerged and she did although I didn't see her. It's been 2 weeks since then and I still haven't seen her or eggs/larvae. The colony didn't seem chaotic or anything either. Should I consider requeening the hive?
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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Where are you located, as it could very well determine some things. What’s your weather been like as far as rain etc? How good are you at being able to locate queens, eggs etc? Not saying you can’t, just asking as many have problems when starting out. Re-queening is an option but unless you are sure it can lead to some unwanted drama. Newly mated queens can take a while to spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm in the northeast. The weather those two weeks were pretty dreary. I am certain that there are no eggs in the hive but I probably couldn't spot an unmarked queen since I have never seen one.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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Is there some one who can spot a queen that could help you do an inspection, really the answer to is the hive queen rite should be a early step, and have high confidence in the answer.
then you are either fine or need to order a queen.

with the sun over your shoulder and the comb tilted away slightly (18%) you should be able to see eggs or larvae after the queen starts laying. Likely the eggs and Larvae will be in the center 1/3 of the frames. I always start at the edge and work in leaving a frame out so I do not roll the bees. take some time on a bright day and look very closely at the frames. If the bees are too thick to see well, give the frame a single sharp shake over the hive to dislodge most of them , then you can see better.

hurtles are meant to be over come. charge...

GG
 
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