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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started with a 32 gallon foodsafe Rubbermaid Brute container, a 42" 3/8 all thread rod and stainless steel nuts washers wing nut and acorn nut. I used 1x 3 pine to fabricate the frame holders.
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The bottom bearing is a 1/2" nylon cutting board that I cut into 2 pieces. Created a small centering divot with a drill press in the bottom piece and a hole through the top layer to keep the rod in place. The end of the allthread has a stainless acorn nut screwed onto it. The nylon cutting board is stacked on a maple 3/4" board shaped to fit snuggly in the bottom. 4 bolts go through this assembly with rubber washers through the bottom of the container. A piece of 1/2" plywood is under the bottom of the container. The bolts continue through this to make the entire bottom very rigid.
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The cross piece at the top is hardwood also. Hickory because I didn't have anymore maple scraps. It sits atop 2 pieces of 2 by 4 bolted to the sides as rests for the upper cross piece. A couple nuts on the allthread hold a nylon spacer at level with the hole of the top cross piece. Bolts loosely slip though the side holes of the cross piece into the rests.
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A nylon fitting that a wine cork fits into is the bottom drain.
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This thing has worked great. 4 frames emptied in under 5 minutes. Minimal wobble when you first start up but it balances out quickly and you can really get those frames spinning.

Feel free to comment and ask questions.
 

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Nice job!

I particularly like the square hole in the arms that capture the ears of the frame. That is a neat way of keeping the frame oriented properly.


I bought a "parted-out" extractor drum and reel from Brushy Mtn's Bargain Barn at a very attractive price. I assumed that the unit had been damaged, then stripped. After I got it functioning I added 2 sections of inexpensive clear plexiglass hinged to the fixed crosspiece at the top of the drum. I like being able to see what's happening inside while still having a lid in place.
 

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This is awesome! The bottom bearing placement was something I was curious about. Cutting board.... great idea!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nice job!

I particularly like the square hole in the arms that capture the ears of the frame. That is a neat way of keeping the frame oriented properly.


I bought a "parted-out" extractor drum and reel from Brushy Mtn's Bargain Barn at a very attractive price. I assumed that the unit had been damaged, then stripped. After I got it functioning I added 2 sections of inexpensive clear plexiglass hinged to the fixed crosspiece at the top of the drum. I like being able to see what's happening inside while still having a lid in place.
Thanks Rader. Design note: I actually did add two pegs further back on each of the bottom arms to keep the frames straight. The lower side of the frame sits between these pegs made from 1/4" dowel and only stick up a half inch. If I had machined those square holes more accurately and/or used hardwood instead of pine I may not of had to. It turns out there is quite a bit of twisting stress on the ears of the frame which could result in weakening the frame though so I think they are needed.

I also tighten the wing nut down very firm which helps keep the frames oriented.

I like the plexiglass idea. I may incorporate that. I like to see inside as well during spinning. I did a few frames without the lid on at the entrance to my garage. I've noticed a lot of yellowjackets cruising the area since. I think more honey flew out than I relalized!
 

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How do you prevent any splinters from the wood getting into the honey?
Have you noticed any wood particles in the honey?

(Spraying the wood pieces down prior to extraction may prevent wood particles coming free during extraction.)
 

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Frank
I'm glad you posted. I was just looking at the beesource plans today.
I may need to make one so I can store it with my homemade chicken plucker.
Thanks for the picks.
gww
 

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Frank
Do you turn one way and then flip the comb or can you just rotate the oposite direction and get the same results as fliping the comb?
Thanks
gww
 

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Frank used a radial extractor design, so there is no reason to flip the comb/frames.

It is extractors with tangential frame orientation that require flipping the frames.

photo credit

Bees build comb so that there is about a 15 degree "up" tilt to the cell openings. If you put the frame in the radial extractor correctly (with the top bar next to the drum wall)then that 15 degree tilt orients the cells correctly to allow the honey to flow out when the extractor spins.

Some interesting:D discussion on this topic in this thread:
http://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...-FOUNDATIONLESS-and-WIRELESS-FRAMES&p=1151249
 

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Rader
Thanks for the picture to put with the words. It was your post in a differrent thread that led me to look up the bee source plan again. so thanks for that also. I had always wondered why you had to flip the frame when I had read poeple doing it. It took your little illistrations to put it in perspective fopr me.
Thanks
gww
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Science girl there should be no reason for wood particles. All of the pieces were cut cleanly. Where do you see the possibility of that happening?
 

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How do you prevent any splinters from the wood getting into the honey?
Have you noticed any wood particles in the honey?

(Spraying the wood pieces down prior to extraction may prevent wood particles coming free during extraction.)
Cheesecloth strainer could take care of that if it is of concern.
 

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Obviously the wooden frames are not a problem for splinters. Why would a wooden part in the extractor be any worse?

Nice piece of workmanship and ingenuity!
 
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