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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I wasn't sure this thread should go under this or diseases and pest. I suppose the forum diseases and pest should apply to the bees themselves.

Anyway those big fat yellow and black carpenter bees are boring holes in nearly every thing wooden I have outside. A couple times so far they have bored a hole into an actual hive box. It's going to take some wood putty to fill those in.

Does anyone know of anything that can be applied to the hive equipment that will deter them from boring holes in it?; that will hopefully have no effect on the honeybees?

I have recently began using that ECO Wood Treatment. That stuff so far seems awesome for keeping the natural wood appearance and supposedly protection from the elements, but it apparently offers no protection from wood pest at least Carpenter Bees anyway.
 

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The carpenter bees around here drive me BATS! However, they do not bother my hives at all. Maybe it is because they are painted? The only actual holes I ever find around the farm are drilled into bare wood, never the painted stuff.

HTH

Rusty
 

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I haven't had any carpenter bees working on my hives. They seem to prefer unpainted wood. Last year I put up some CCA pressure treated posts (they were still wet) and it was like I had opened a buffet. The treatment offered no protection.
 

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Yes If I can't come up with something, I just might have to give up keeping the natural wood appearance I like and go back to exterior latex.
 

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Well the ants are coming from somewhere outside of your hive. Your first thing on the list is to keep them out.
I use 4 frisbees....one under each leg and fill with oil. This creates a barrier that the ants cant cross and into your hives. I have plenty oil around the house from the vehicals. doesnt matter if its used or not. Check for grass too....one blade of grass leaning on your hive stand can create a bridge for the ants to climb up.
 

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SANTA ---read it over again ---NOT ANTS ---but carpenter BEES --on my barn they drilled hole on the unpainted 2 x 8 on the sidling doors -behind the doors[[[ 12 ft.]]]--I used 1 cup of dish water soap and 1 gallon of water --sprayed the bees and the holes --kept the sprayer setting there by the doors --I would spray as often --it did a far job on them I will see when if ever it warms up again --
 

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Paint is the only thing that keeps carpenter bees from eating my house, let alone my hive. However, I get a good workout taking them out with a tennis racquet!
 

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Anyway those big fat yellow and black carpenter bees are boring holes in nearly every thing wooden I have outside.

Does anyone know of anything that can be applied to the hive equipment that will deter them from boring holes in it?; that will hopefully have no effect on the honeybees?
Forget about applying anything to the hives.Give your children/grandchildren tennis racquets or those electronic flyswatters.Helps to develop hand,eye coordination.
 

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Carpenter bees seem to have a preference for 1" pine boards. Second choice, 2" pine boards. Pressure treatment does not faze them at all, nor do most wood treatments. I've had limited success with borax treatments (Boracare) on our cabin logs, but wouldn't recommend it around honeybees.

They seem to avoid fresh oil-based stains, but on the flip side that seems to attract squirrels, who love chewing on it. I have not tried paint but have seen that recommendation often.

After they destroyed some pine trim, I put up cypress replacements, which does seem to help.

When I built my new garage, instead of wood "board and batten" on the second floor, I used concrete panels, strips, and trim, a brand-x version of Hardy Board. This seems to deter them pretty well.

If you make hives out of 3/4" Hardy planks, let us know what kind of tools you used. Diamond saws is my guess. I doubt they would blow away in a stiff breeze. Probably go for mediums ... a deep concrete super full of honey would probably require a fork lift.

I've seen a home-made carpenter bee trap, I think on YouTube.
 

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@Allniter. Bees huh? My mistake. Carpenter ANTS are a big prob here in Fl and my mind read that instead of bees. My apologies.
 

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I don't know if they're selling the traps or what, but there's a YouTube video on traps, I just Googled carpenter bees. From the looks of it, wouldn't be to hard to make.
 

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I was given a 10+ yr old wooden play set this Winter. We got it all put back together early this Spring. Wife won't go near it it's got so many carpenter bees living in it and flying around it. It's majorly infested. This time of year we always see the carpenter bees out around the property.

But they've never touched my painted hives. I've been considering dipping my newly built hive equipment lately. Would dipping be a solution to carpenter bees also?
 

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You can reassure your wife.Carpenter "bees" aren't bees and they do not sting.They just look like bumblebees.
They don't know that. The males like to get in your face and intimidate you. Works on most people. When they do it to me I go get my badminton racquet. Score so far, Me: several hundred? Carpenter bees: 0. Of course, they only have to score 1.
 

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You can reassure your wife.Carpenter "bees" aren't bees and they do not sting.They just look like bumblebees.

Actually, just like honey bees, female carpenter bees can sting; they just don't die when they do, much like the queen honey bee. And as for them not being bees??

Carpenter bees:
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Suborder: Apocrita
Superfamily: Apoidea
Family: Apidae
Subfamily: Xylocopinae
Tribe: Xylocopini
Genus: Xylocopa
Latreille, 1802


Honey bee:
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Apidae
Subfamily: Apinae
Tribe: Apini
Latreille, 1802
Genus: Apis
Linnaeus, 1758
 

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The males are the ones that freak everyone out by hovering around the outsides of the structures. But F6 is right, Yea, the females do sting if they want to.
 
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