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Just fill in 10 frames in a 10 frame box and they will fix it. Seems like you are using less then the correct number. In a honey box this is fine since it makes uncapping much easier. So 9 in a 10 frame box is what lots of us do. But, you need have the comb built out first before you leave out a frame.

I also dont see staples or nails in though the top bar into the side bars on some of your frames. Did you put a staple under from the sides into the top? You want them done right or later they will come apart when they are full and you will be sorry. My son would not put the lock staple underneath because he said it did not need it. He did hundreds that way and I have to carry an electric stapler with me to fix them when I find them years later. I have stopped getting mad at him but, curse him in the bee yard when I find one. He has moved on and drives trucks now and does not live with us anymore and does not help but, his presence is still felt when I find those frames that pull apart..
 

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Your situation is not that uncommon as bees make new combs on foundation ("drawing the combs out"). You will notice that cells on the foundation of the frame next to the overbuilt comb do not have much depth. Not a big thing, it is something you can correct when you get around to it.

To correct it immediately, you can cut the overbuilt comb to the desired depth and put a frame with properly drawn out comb next to it. The excess space will then be gone and both frames will be of the desired depth. You can wait until harvest time and cut the comb back after extracting the honey. You choose the time to correct it. HTH :)
 

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I agree with east side buzz. I am foundationless and I some times start with eleven in a box as I make the frames a tiny bit narrower. I used to put ten in with standard frames and shove them as close as possible with any empty space equalized at each side of the box. When the flow is on and the bees are in build up, they really do well. When they slow down on building they get lazy and start make comb with honey wider in places. I just got in two of the hives today. In this case, I take the super wide stuff and move it around. Lots of times I will smash it against a wall of the hive. Then I will space any empties between the best drawn frames that I have. even smashing them together and making the bees make new bee space because I removed it still leaves me leaving frames out. The ones that are in the hive I still place as absolute close to each other as the comb will let me and this means killing some bees and really smashing the fat parts. Today I ended up with only 9 frames in what I normaly have eleven in. So my unexperianced answer is.
1. Start with as many frames as possible and put them as close to each other as possible.

2. adjust if you have to to keep the hive inspectable but do it in a way that the bees have as little space as possible to keep drawing wax in any empties.

I am still learning but have found so far that this is the easiest way if you don't want to spend all day making things perfect.
Good luck
gww
 

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I count ten frames in the picture...I suspect they go in the box we are talking about. I make sure the frames are closely pushed together each time I close the hive. This type of occurrence can happen every time you put new frames with foundation on a hive, so check it often and move frames as needed to guide their progress. It is no big thing. :)
 

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Are those frames just pushed apart for the photo? I think I see a corresponding absence of comb in the adjoining frame.

This is Standard Operating Procedure for our bees. They usually keep brood comb pretty uniform (the queen has a preferred depth for laying eggs), but for storing nectar they'll often build out if there is nothing on the adjoining frame.

This is inconvenient during inspections, but harmless. It can be cut off and they'll repair the damage, but we generally live with it until honey harvest time, when we'll slice it off even. Any bulge like that will stop you from re-arranging frames, and you might have to pull a pair at one time. This is the classic "bee space" problem.

We routinely clean up burr comb and bridge comb.
 

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There is usually a corresponding gap in the adjacent frame.I shake bees off both frames,reverse the one with the gap and press the bulge into the comb opposite.The bees will fix it.
Scrape your frame ears of propolis to maintain bee space and push frames together and then center in the box after every manipulation.If you take a frame from the center and put it on the edge and push it against the wall you have lost your bee space.By centering you frames you provide bee space all around.
Most run 8 or 9 frames in a honey super to get deeper cells and make uncapping easier.
Some run 9 frames in the brood nest which is fine if you use a follower board, but,if you don't,you will end up with bulging honey bands which makes for difficulty rearranging frames. Also there is 10% more brood cells with 10 frames.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Three and a half year-old post. I use the long serrated bread knife also.
 

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Three and a half year-old post. I use the long serrated bread knife also.
I had written in another thread that it's winter, it's cold, many of us are on COVID work from home so we're all bored. Hopefully our girls are tightly clustered, well fed, warm and happy. Yes, we are all reading old threads due to the sub-category below current threads of "Recommended Reading". I find some of the old thread pertinent to our current situations and subjects that we're interested in. I guess commenting on old threads is just a reaction but when others join in, it's more interesting info.
 
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