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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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My 9-year-old son has been regularly helping me on swarm calls lately. Here's a rather large swarm we picked up a few evenings ago of which he did most of the work. He got stung on the forehead because his veil got too close to his face from looking straight up, but he keeps on trucking almost like nothing happened.


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What a fantastic video to start my day! Great job Marshall!
I tried getting my grandson (now 11) interested in bees but it's not happening. The grandgirls either.

We had a few swarms in my area at the end of February, but I have not heard or seen any since then, and none to bait boxes since February.
 

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He's a tough cookie! Thanks for sharing, watching this video gave my 5 yr old a much needed confidence boost! Last year he wouldn't go near the hives with me, but after watching he said he's ready!
 

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Great job! he took that sing like a champ. This will be our first year keeping bees and my 9 year old daughter is very excited. I hope she is as enthusiastic as Marshall. Maybe we'll have to make a couple nukes for our top bar hives just in case.
 

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Awesome job JP...err I mean Marshall ! He reacted better than when I first took one to the head looking up in a veil I always wear a ball cap under now so the brim holds it off my face
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
He did real well. In the future wear a ball cap under the suit. It will keep the screen away from his face.
Yes, that's good advice !!!

So my dad calls this morning paranoid that CPS will see the video and attempt to investigate and/or confiscate Marshall for "child neglect" because
Marshall only had flip-flops on. My dad loves the video, by the way, but he knows how crazy and paranoid things have gotten with CPS, especially here in Florida.

By the way, I didn't notice he only had flip-flops until we arrived at the call....lol.......and as you all know, bees don't generally care about feet, especially swarms.

I don't know. Should I be concerned?

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I wouldn't think so esp since he had on all the protective gear. You are not forcing him to do the work with bees.

There was an article about a young bee keeper in florida, 8-9 doing swarms, raising them, getting stung. It was in the news paper. He didn't get taken from his parents. In fact the kids honey won first place.

Tell your son way to go! He is a trooper.
I was watching the girls when we first got them, 20 feet away, one flew over and got me right above my eye. Looked like I took a hit to the face! Swollen eye for days. That was before I started using unkers, that stuff works great for me.
 

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This is a good way to lose a swarm. Taking handfuls of bees and dropping them into an empty box can really get them airborne and all take off. You're fortunate they stayed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This is a good way to lose a swarm. Taking handfuls of bees and dropping them into an empty box can really get them airborne and all take off. You're fortunate they stayed.
Barry, I'm open to suggestions.

Admittedly I'm mainly experienced with cut-outs - not swarms.

Since I couldn't shake the branch or cut the branch, what could I have done, or had Marshall do differently?

I did place top bars over them very soon into it.

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This is a good way to lose a swarm. Taking handfuls of bees and dropping them into an empty box can really get them airborne and all take off. You're fortunate they stayed.
That was my thought too as I watched the video, the bees leaving either at that time or later. I had a situation like yours and I ran something along the tree branch at the base of the swarm to try and get them to fall in one clump--I think a dustpan with rubber edge. Then used bee brush after, and smoked like you said.

Still, this was his first time and I think it's awesome. I too hope they stayed.
 

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Barry, I'm open to suggestions.
Anything you can do to "anchor" them is a good thing. A top bar with comb, even empty comb, to place in the hive would be good. I always take frames of empty comb with me when I go on a swarm call. If warm enough, the best is comb with brood in it for those swarms like this one where you can't cut the branch and have to pull the cluster apart to get them off. You just want to do everything you can to avoid getting them airborne.

Another option is to place the hive/box right under them on the ladder and let them make the move into it. If you give them a reason to use it, they usually will. I've taken a handful of bees from the cluster, dropped them in and placed a cover on right away and then let them do their thing. They will start moving in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Anything you can do to "anchor" them is a good thing. A top bar with comb, even empty comb, to place in the hive would be good. I always take frames of empty comb with me when I go on a swarm call. If warm enough, the best is comb with brood in it for those swarms like this one where you can't cut the branch and have to pull the cluster apart to get them off. You just want to do everything you can to avoid getting them airborne.

Another option is to place the hive/box right under them on the ladder and let them make the move into it. If you give them a reason to use it, they usually will. I've taken a handful of bees from the cluster, dropped them in and placed a cover on right away and then let them do their thing. They will start moving in.
Yes, I concur 100%.

You are exactly correct.

But you have to admit, when they knew they were being moved into a top bar hive, they were as content as could be !!! :D

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