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I built some similar 6 frame nucs 3 years ago. they have been good. mine do not have a divider board and the ends are 3/4 plywood, so dividers will be in some of the next batch. I have my vents at the bottom to allow for drainage. the ones in use mostly have the big plastic discs, nice but not low cost, I got some of the small metal ones to try. I have some matching supers so I can go 2 stories with 12 frames total, also working real well. I have similar telo tops but had trouble on a couple with propilis, once the trouble was memorable. now I have migratory type tops with a cut-out for a mason jar with a screen to keep the bees in the box, I like this a lot and just started building another dozen out of scrap odds & ends.. I like your divider idea. I will find things snug with the divider but I think i like everything matching up even more. maybe I will do some of the new tops with 2 jar holes at opposite corners.. hmm. food for thought. thanx for sharing. I do think the 6 frame is better for me than 4 or 5.
 

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Hello Rod, good to see that someone else is working with this format. :)

In case it's of interest, this is my version of what I call the "six-and-a-half-frame nuc" !

The difference from your own approach is that I use a slide-able divider which lives in the box permanently, so that correct frame spacing is maintained.

In 1x6 mode :




In 2x3 mode :





The covers are placed on top of the box, so that a beespace is maintained between frame top bars and covers :




And like yourself, I much prefer telescoping covers ...




The only downside to my approach is that the divider takes as long to trim to size as the rest of the box takes to make (!), as it really needs to be a precise fit. I've made 8 of these so far to test as initial prototypes, which are now fitted with low profile overhead feeders. So far, so good.

Best of luck
LJ
 

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Rod or LJ, could either of you point me towards the plans for the telescoping covers. I built some 5-frame DCoates Nucs to use as swarm traps and swarm collection boxes. I'm not pleased with my migratory covers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Rod or LJ, could either of you point me towards the plans for the telescoping covers. I built some 5-frame DCoates Nucs to use as swarm traps and swarm collection boxes. I'm not pleased with my migratory covers.
As far as I know there aren't plans per say, I just measured the outside dimensions of box added a little and built the frame of migratory from cheap 1by from Lowe's then a plywood top well painted. The period gets cut to like 10 1/8th by 21.5 inches, so your telescoping frame matches that.
 

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make the telo tops just like any other ones but narrower. a loose fit is way better than a tight one. I like 1/2 inch loose or even a bit more. I like heavier steel than most use now, 24 gauge it is harder to work with but most of the time weights are not needed. I still use the telo covers sometimes when no feeding is indicated. tonight I filled 5 mason jars no interruption to the bees, the bees did not even notice.
 

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Yes - I'm with the others in not working to any plans.

Just cut a rectangle of plywood, the length of which is equal to the length of the box, plus the thickness of the rim timbers (x2) plus a half-inch gap. The width of the plywood being determined the same way.

Then just nail the rim timbers around the edge of the plywood, and glue and nail the corners if you wish (I do).

Cutting aluminium sheet to fit the roof is tricky the first time you do it, but easy thereafter (like most things in life) - I could post some photos and an explanation of the procedure I use, if anyone's interested.

LJ
 
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