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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One hive had capped worker brood, all ages of larvae nicely organized in arches, and eggs in empty cells. The only concerning thing was that some of those egg cells had 2 or 3 eggs in them, I'd say about 1 in 3 egg cells were like that. I didn't find the queen but didn't really look.

So, my question is, do otherwise good queens sometimes do that? Or has it gone laying worker?
 

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Flat capped worker cells, should not have had time to go LW.
New superceder queen? Cells on bottom or sides? Nectar crowding her out of laying room?
 

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New queens sometimes lay multiple eggs. Not for long, but at first.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Flat capped worker cells, should not have had time to go LW.
New superceder queen? Cells on bottom or sides? Nectar crowding her out of laying room?
I believe this is an overwintered queen from sometime last year, because the colony is an "overwintered nuc" I purchased this spring and I have not seen queen cells.

The eggs were on the bottom of the cells.

I would say they were getting a bit crowded, yes. I did not see many completely empty cells for the queen to lay in. I put a super on.

Unless someone's got a better plan I'll wait and see if new cappings look like drone brood before requeening or doing anything else. As long as they're making worker brood and building up OK I'll ignore the odd egg situation. *shrug*

I guess I could give them a frame of eggs from another colony just to make sure they can make a queen if they need one, but since most cells only had one egg on the bottom, I'm thinking I've got a laying queen. Plus their behavior just seemed normal -- calm and productive.
 

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Are you planning on wintering in just a single box? If not, and if they are a just-installed nuc I would get the second brood box drawn now rather than adding a super. Your best window for drawing new comb is right now, so I'd focus on getting winter combs made first before playing around with super-sized ones. (I winter, up here north of Albany, in three, 10-frame deeps, which is what I use for supers, too. YMMV)

Sometimes I see multiple eggs (not as many as 1/3 of the cells, though) in perfectly normal, worker brood-laying hives. You probably know this, but varroa frass (feces) look like tiny white specks, too? Guanine deposits from varroa look quite different from bee eggs, but still, if you weren't familiar with both you could possibly confuse them. I have had students who were very pleased they could finally see eggs, only to learn that what they were seeing was guanine specks. Oh well, another Teaching Moment opportunity!

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you planning on wintering in just a single box? If not, and if they are a just-installed nuc I would get the second brood box drawn now rather than adding a super. Your best window for drawing new comb is right now, so I'd focus on getting winter combs made first before playing around with super-sized ones. (I winter, up here north of Albany, in three, 10-frame deeps, which is what I use for supers, too. YMMV)

Sometimes I see multiple eggs (not as many as 1/3 of the cells, though) in perfectly normal, worker brood-laying hives. You probably know this, but varroa frass (feces) look like tiny white specks, too? Guanine deposits from varroa look quite different from bee eggs, but still, if you weren't familiar with both you could possibly confuse them. I have had students who were very pleased they could finally see eggs, only to learn that what they were seeing was guanine specks. Oh well, another Teaching Moment opportunity!

Nancy
Thanks Nancy.

I should've explained the setup as it's a little unusual. They're in the left side of a "Palmer style" double nuc. The queen has access to 12 frames (4 over 4 over 4), about 10 of which are drawn, and I just added a queen excluder and a deep super for the two colonies to share. If you followed my description, that means the whole stack is now 4 deep boxes. (Like you, I only use deep frames.)

I'm not yet sure how I'll overwinter them exactly but last winter I used all standard undivided double deeps and all survived, so I'd say that's my default for this winter. I've got more colonies than I really want, so at some point I'll probably combine a few, and then having enough drawn comb for winter shouldn't be an issue.

I'm quite sure that what I saw was eggs and not guanine, but thanks for checking. Often one egg would be standing up as if it had just been laid while the other would be laying flat as if it had been laid a few days ago. *shrug* The cells with multiple eggs were mostly in an arch in between they very youngest brood to the inside and upright eggs to the outside.
 

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Since you have many cells with only one egg, capped brood and only some with two or three eggs, the advice above regarding a young queen is probably better than my initial read of the situation. Your idea to move some eggs/young larvae over shouldn't hurt unless you move it from a diseased hive. I've done that a few times to see if they had a very young queen or were queenless.
 

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New queens sometimes lay multiple eggs. Not for long, but at first.....
Hi Ravenseye, just did a check of a swarm caught 7-10 days ago. I see 5 frames of bees, almost every cell is an egg or 2 or 3, or honey or pollen. IE none of the cells in the cluster area is empty. seeing this post when I searched on multiple eggs in cell, I am reaching out to confirm. no larvae, so my assumption is virgin queen with the swarm, just starting and not enough cells for her that are ready. I added 6 more combs as I only had 4 in the swarm trap. I will wait for a bit to let her settle down. Any concerns In your Opinion. As you have commented here I was thinking you have seen this.
GG
 

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I'd wait and watch. Swarms can be hard to predict but what happens as far as brood goes will tell you in the long run. Giving a little more space based on what you've described isn't a bad thing....
 
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