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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This hive is from a bee removal we did last month. The hive ended up with 5 frames of bees and 9 frames of brood and no queen. They made a queen she hatched and is laying lots of eggs, but one frame has a section of cells with up to 5 eggs in them. All of the eggs were in the bottom of the cells (no eggs on the walls). The queen looks good and healthy and they have plenty of larva and capped brood. I have read about laying workers and the books all say that it happens when a queen is not present and that they will kill a queen if it is introduced. Also, that a queen will never lay more than one egg in a cell. So, I have no idea what is going on or how to help the girls out. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
 

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Keep an eye out to see if they are all drones hatching. It is a sure sign of un-fertilized eggs, not necessarily a laying worker though. Some young queens do not quite have the control as they do when they get a little older. The nurse bees should be moving the eggs around to have one egg per cell. Maybe your nurse population is a little low since you are just starting up this colony?
 

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Don’t sound like a problem, young and strong queens can get carried away when they first start laying. The fact that she is allowed to lay indicates the hive has already accepted her. I have never heard of laying workers in hives that have the ability to raise a queen.
Laying workers are actually rare and normally happens when they become hopelessly queen less. Things sound like they are in good shape, get ready to super they will go bang soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The queen is still laying up to 3 eggs in a cell, pattern is not good (but the comb is tied in and pieced together). I first found multi eggs 10 days ago. Also, when I inspected the hive I found about 15-20 wax moth larva on the outer frames. I know that their numbers are down from raising their own queen, so I put in a full frame of capped larva. I have also been feeding them the honey that I dug out of the wall during the removal, but they dont seem to be drawing out comb or even attching the pieces of brood comb to the frames very wel.l
1. Should I requeen this hive or am I chasing a pipe dream that they will once again thrive?
2. Should I go into the hive every couple of days and remove the wax moth larva?
3. Will they draw out comb faster with honey or sugar syrup?
4. Should I add Honey B Healthy to what ever I feed them?

All help and ideas are appreciated!
 

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>1. Should I requeen this hive or am I chasing a pipe dream that they will once again thrive?

She's laying fine, there just isn't enough room for her. The bees only prepare the cells they want her to lay in and there are too few of them at the moment. Requeening will only slow things down more.

>2. Should I go into the hive every couple of days and remove the wax moth larva?

You need to reduce the size of the hive to what they can manage. Remove everything that is infested and freeze it. Leave them only what they seriously occupy. Get the density of bees up and they will take care of things.

>3. Will they draw out comb faster with honey or sugar syrup?'

They can't guard what they have and you want them to draw more?

>4. Should I add Honey B Healthy to what ever I feed them?

How will that help? What problem are you trying to solve?
 

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I have used a follower board as Michael has mentioned in weaker colonies to reduce them dow from 10 frames to say....6 without building a smaller hive. It is a solid peice and takes the place of one frame, this way i can add one frame at a time until they get stronger without adding to omuch room. I do this with great success on smaller colonies to keep them strong.
 

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Michael Bush;571604 She's laying fine said:
Yep, I agree. It's not just young queens that do this. My breeder queens are isolated on 3 combs by an excluder. When I graft, I find cells with not only multiple eggs, but multiple larvae. In fact, I have grafted from these cells and taken both larvae. These are queens at least 2 years old.
 

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I also have Queens every now and then, when coming out of winter will lay multiple eggs per cell. I think it is just from not laying in a few months, takes them a bit to get into the groove again.

Question for you though... when you said they raised a Queen, were there eggs in the wax cells you took from the cut out? Just curious as to where they or what they raised the Queen from?

If there were no eggs moved with the hive, it could be a laying worker... just a thought. Laying workers can take on the slight appearance of a Queen as their ovaries change size to produce eggs.

Matt
http://collinsbeefeeder.com/ :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes, the old queen had a great laying pattern and tons of eggs and larva. I wish she would have survived. We removed nine frames of brood comb.
 
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