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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Got 8 hives on 4x8 trailer
on screened bottom boards and I need to move them about 40 miles. I was thinking of putting moving screens on the tops (do you think I need them?), closing the bottoms with strips of foam, then strapping them individually to eye bolts that I have between the hives.

These are single deeps with two mediums. Should I remove one medium? Do I need to use hive staples??

Any suggestions from those who have moved hives are appreciated. I rarely move hives.

Thanks!
Larry
 

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Larry, I don't see a picture. Is there supposed to be one?
 

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Seems like they would not need any supers removed or hive staples if the hives are pushed together and strapped tightly. Depending on the temp and whether there is air circulation under those screened bottom boards whether I'd use moving screens on top to move them 40 miles.
 

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Should not be a problem. You are at about 800 lbs cargo weight, and the trailer should handle that.
I use plastic drywall corner (it is sold for use in bathrooms) to close hives. It is perforated, able to be cut with scissors, and can be stapled to the hives.
A piece of batten wood really stabilizes hives if they are not stacked against each other. Run it diagonally for shear, and screw it in.
Hives travel better when then are stacked tight against each other.
I used to run a utility trailer with hives permanently installed for custom pollination of small hobby farm-estates. Worked great -- drop it off, pick it up --- until someone unknown hitched it up and drove it off.
 

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Just suggestions here...

Rather than foam, why not use a strip of #8 mesh folded into a wedge? That would still allow circulation through the entrance, with that said, I take it these have solid bottom boards? If screened, the foam should be fine.

Taking a super off the top would lower the center of gravity of each hive (and make them lighter to move).

A 4x8 trailer is going to be rather "bouncy" so whatever you can do to stabilize the hives will help. I wouldn't really want to move them unless the hive boxes are fastened together with staples or ratchet straps for each hive...my preference would be straps. The front of the trailer will bounce less than the middle or rear of it.

Plan your route to avoid any beat-up, pot-holed roads if you can. Decrease the air pressure in the trailer tires some to give it a softer ride...you're not hauling dirt or pea gravel so you don't need the max air. :)

I tend to over think things...a commercial/experienced beek may throw them in the trailer and never give a second thought about securing them. :s

Best wishes on the move.
Ed

ETA: Oops, I see they are on screened bottom boards...the foam should work.
 

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I have a 4 x 6 trailer, it takes 9 hives to a layer. You don't need to strap them with eyelets, put mesh on the top, or remove mediums.

Just chuck the hives on as they are, Position them hard against each other so a rope can be thrown over & pulled really tight. Don't block them in just get moving & don't stop till you get there.
 

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I do not like to depend on friction to keep the boxes in line. If bottoms and all hive boxes are not identical in width etc., they are not so easy to gang wrap. Prepare them like you were going to make an emergency brake application test! It happened to me with a large wood cook stove and the back of the cab bears the marks. The pallet was well secured but the strapping had some stretch. Hives should position so frames should run fore and aft of the trailer.

Travel at night but be prepared to deal with daytime heat if you have a breakdown. When bees are shook up they give off much more heat than when unstressed. Have water with you to be able to spray them. If you remove the supers you will crowd the bees into the deeps. Check for queen cells in a few days anyways.
 

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Strap them tie together just like oldtimer said. That is how the big boys do it. Other wise if they all try to leave they will sufacate
 

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SNL,

I moved two, four box colonies two weeks ago to my bear fence protected summer out yard at 10,000 feet in an open 4 X 8 trailer with a 2+ hour trailer trip. The night before I broke the hives down into 2 box units with either a SBB or a screened top board and ratchet strapped both ways. The four units were wrapped in a tarp to minimize gusts of wind and all tied and strapped in the front of the trailer. It all worked well and was much nicer than last year when I had them all inside my SUV. I took 80# of honey per hive last year.

Steve
 
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