Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thanks for looking over my question.

I need to move two hives off of a stand for a short time to do some stand adjustments, and I was wondering if there would be any advantage to screening the entrances closed while I make the repairs? The goal would be to limit the bee frenzy (if any) by keeping the bees inside while I work, but I don't know if I'm missing something. I am aware the forgers will be returning, but it's for a short time, and it will still be ventilated.

I should add that I am currently using drywall sanding screens as my reducers, so it would only take a moment to fully close it off, so there would be no extra work.


Thanks,
b1rd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
If by "short time" we're only talking about a few minutes, then I wouldn't bother to do anything special (although you could do as you describe) - just move the hives towards their direction of normal foraging, so that returning bees will arrive at their hive entrance a foot or two earlier than expected. Some will, some won't - but overall it shouldn't be an issue,
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies.

I mainly wanted to make sure there wasn't anything I wasn't overlooking.


b1rd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
I'm actually in the middle of a hive-stand swap as I write this. (I've just come in for a coffee and a breather). A swap is of course much easier and quicker than a repair.

So - I've got everything I need on site ready - new stand, spirit level, adjustment blocks and so on. So all I'll do now is split the boxes (it's a 3-box stack) - move them forward about 3 feet - and swap the stands over. The only delay will be in checking that the new stand is level. It's 3 p.m here, so lots of foragers are currently returning, and I expect to be working for a few minutes inside a cloud of bees as those which miss the boxes will start hunting around for the hive entrance. These are foragers of course, not guard bees, and so I don't expect any negative behaviour - but nevertheless, I like to wear a bee-suit for this kind of operation, as confused bees can end up anywhere - like inside my clothes ... :)
'best
LJ

4 p.m.
Just in case anyone 'out there' is wondering why a hive stand needs to be swapped-over:



A bad case of 'foot-rot'', as the load-spreader plates had sunk into soft ground allowing damp soil to come into contact with wooden stand legs. Has now been replaced with steel on top of concrete.
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I keep a screen on my hive that I can bend up or down to close it off temporarily. I've needed to do that as a result of some robbing issues. But anyhow, I was going to move my hive about 100ft from its original location and put it on a new stand to get it into some better sunlight. Was planning to do that tonight actually, and yeah my plan was to close the hive off and move it at night, so everyone would be home and in bed, then the foragers could re-orient themselves in the morning as they go out.

Not sure if that would be a good recommendation for you to do at night as well or if that's bad advice, so don't take my word for it exactly. Its my first year and I've only got one hive, but I've been treating it like my educational course on bee keeping for next year haha.

Good luck anyhow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,937 Posts
@Beexster it would be to your benefit to look up Michael Bush on how to move a hive a short distance. If you are just going to close it and move it in one shot in that short of distance, foragers will be lost, hive will weaken, fighting and robbing will be encouraged. Not a good time of year to take a risk. They can be moved a short distance if done properly. J
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top