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I want to give two hives boost by taking a frame or two of capped brood from another hive (w/no bees on it) and giving it to them for population boost. However, the donor hive is a 20 minute drive from the new hives.

How long can the capped brood be alone and not covered by nurse bees? It’s obviously Summer and outdoor temperature is in the 80s and 90s.
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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So you are looking at an 15-20 minute trip. You need to wrap the brood frames with a damp cloth, and transport in a insulated container. Igloo ice chest, etc. At that distance you should be fine.
 

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I wouldn't hesitate to move it without doing anything special, personally. Capped brood is pretty robust. I had a frame of mostly drones in a honey super that emerged after DAYS of sitting in my garage. I wouldn't sweat it. That said, don't put it on the front seat of your car and blast the A/C or anything. When I move brood like that (rarely) I just chuck it in a nuc box and go with it.
And when I graft that frame of open larva is probably pretty routinely out of the mother colony for a half an hour and sometimes in the cooler weather. The last graft I did was in a light rain and about 60 degrees. 27 of 30 grafts took and that's tiny, young larva.

I think you'll be fine.
 

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You need to wrap the brood frames with a damp cloth, and transport in a insulated container
No need. This is capped brood.

I keep all bunch of padded large shipping envelopes (Amazon, FedEx, etc) around just for such jobs (short trips around).
These envelopes are great in that - there just a little bit of air around the object you move (capped brood, queen, etc) so don't worry of dehydration too much as well as the envelope is insulated from too hot/too cold.

This envelope I am looking at here (says BM5/JM9 on it) should easily feet two medium Lang frames or one deep Lang frame.
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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No need. This is capped brood.

I keep all bunch of padded large shipping envelopes (Amazon, FedEx, etc) around just for such jobs (short trips around).
These envelopes are great in that - there just a little bit of air around the object you move (capped brood, queen, etc) so don't worry of dehydration too much as well as the envelope is insulated from too hot/too cold.

This envelope I am looking at here (says BM5/JM9 on it) should easily feet two medium Lang frames or one deep Lang frame.
Never thought about doing that, creature of habit I guess. It is a great idea, need to start saving my envelopes.
 

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I don't want to take too many bees from donor hive
I'd be more worried about taking a queen, personally. Have done that before. Pulled brood from multiple hives, chuck it in a box. Get the the other yard to divvy it out and the 3rd frame in there's a queen wandering around. :D
 

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Never thought about doing that, creature of habit I guess. It is a great idea, need to start saving my envelopes.
Also - consider you can slice and dice those envelopes as you wish; make them bigger/smaller/tape them together
Those padded envelopers are a great resource when doing bees.
Of course, I got too many now.
I am a trash hoarder. LOL

PS: thinking, heck, one can make a mating nuc out of a padded envelope; :)
 

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At that point JW absent a cage you simply pop her in your mouth for safekeeping until you get home correct? ;)


BTW, do queen stings hurt more than the average?
 

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At that point JW absent a cage you simply pop her in your mouth for safekeeping until you get home correct? ;)


BTW, do queen stings hurt more than the average?
Haha, I've always got a queen cage with me. But at that point it's "guess we're making a nuc today too". Just roll with it.

Queen stings... I've only ever been stung by virgin queens and they don't feel like much at all. I'd venture to say a virgin queen biting your arm 'hurts' just as bad as her sting. She's not pumping you with a venom sac after she stings, so it's not usually a big deal.
 

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When doing cut outs I have brood comb sitting for several hours before we head back to the house. Very very seldom do we have overheated brood or chilled brood. Put them in a nuc box with a lid on it and head out, no worries. Keep them out of the direct sun lite and away from the A/C as pointed out.
 
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