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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to move a few frames from a colony I have that is really strong to one that is not doing as well.
What am I looking for on the frames I select to move. Shouyld they be mostly brood or honey or even split?
What about the bees that are on the frames? Should I remove all bees from the frames I move? I would think they would not do well in a new hive with all those unfamiliar scents.
 

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It's warm enough where you are to just move frames of brood. I tend to move sealed brood as often as I can so that the weaker hive will have new bees quickly. The most I move at a time is 2 frames out of one full brood chamber...as long as the queen is a strong producer, she should catch up pretty quick.
 

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I would move one with mostly capped brood, if there are a few eggs in it even better.

The bees that are on the frame of brood will for the most part be nurse bees, not much if any fighting will take place. Leave the bees on the frame since with the introduction of capped brood you will also need the extra bees to cover it.

Just be sure not to relocate the queen from the strong hive to the weak hive.
If the frames that you are replacing in the weak hive have drawn comb with little stores in it or just foundation, shake the bees off of it and place it into the strong hive. Don't leave any frames out.

Good luck with it.

G3
 

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i am a newbee at this also, i thought someone would have mentioned it but i will and see if someone will elaborate on it. when introducing a colony to another colony, i thought, read that you put a newspaper in between the two, cut slits in it and within a couple of days the bees from both sides have eaten it away now the two colonies have become one. something with the pheromones that are different, hope a veteran will add his advice
 

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You do that when combining hives and you have a bunch of forgers in the hive your are combining with the weaker one. When adding frames I usually just place an slide the brood in the one box over to one side of center, place an empty frame in the middle and then add the frames of brood to the other side. No problem with acceptance as pointed out earlier it is mostly nurse bees on the frames. You should notice a huge boost to the hive doing this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK, after work today I moved a frame. First I opened the strong hive and found the top deep full of honey. That thing must have weighed 60 pounds. I tried to remove it but it was glued to the bottom deep. I used the hive tool and seperated the deeps but the frames were still attached from top to bottom. I then rotated the top deep on its axis and was able to remove it. In the bottom deep I found lots of capped brood and pollen. One thing to note here. I found fully developed larva lying on top of the frames of the bottom deep. Apparently when I twisted the two apart the larva that were in those cells were cast out into the open. The bee space must not be right. I felt terrible about it but there was nothing else I could have done. I guess at least 20 bees never got to mature. I found a good frame of capped brood. It also had about 25% pollen. I gave it a gentle shake to remove most bees and then made sure the queen was not on that frame. Now here is where I may have screwed up. I removed a frame from the top deep of the weak colony. This frame had absolutley no drawn comb on it. I did not remove the top deep from the weak hive because I was worried I have had them open too long already so I put the brood in the middle of the top deep for the weak colony and I put the frame with foundation in the middle of the top deep of the strong colony.
I am also wondering if I should pull my feeder from the strong hive and add the super. I am feeding because I thought we were in a dearth but I don't know. Any thoughts on this?

On a side note I seem to be squashing more bees than I would like when I do an inspection. I probably squashed 10 bees today plus the bloody brood massacre :eek:
 

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1."...The bee space must not be right..."
sometimes they do this to "bridge" the space, sometimes they are given worker brood foundation and need some place to raise a few drones. dont worry.
2."...must have weighed 60 pounds..."
more like 90. be very carefull of your back. take half or more of the frames out if you need to.
3."...where I may have screwed up..."
nope, thats right. do a search at the top of the page for "checkerboarding"
4."...I seem to be squashing more bees ..."
'cause you've got more bees, and they have less space. use your smoker to drive'em down, and dont worry. as many as 2-3 HUNDRED die every day.
5."...I thought we were in a dearth ..."
we are now.
good luck,mike
 
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