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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, this is my first post to the site, although I have been reading (probable too much) for several months now. I'm considering the purchase of a poly hive that is posted on the FOR SALE section of this site. Although I had not planed to have any bees this year I thought I would jump in a get my feet wet. At this time my biggest question is what will be the correct way to transport them to my home. I do not own a pick up but could probabley borrow my fathers and his has a cap on the box. When they are being transport like this should the hive entrance be covered with something to keep the gals inside. Any other information that would be needed is greatly appreciated.
Also I have thouroghly enjoyed reading many of the postings, it seems that every one is very willing to help each other. Some times I think I may be getting too much information and the more I get the more complicated this whole beekeeping thing appears to be.
Thanks to all!
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>At this time my biggest question is what will be the correct way to transport them to my home. I do not own a pick up but could probabley borrow my fathers and his has a cap on the box.

That can work, but I'd leave it open if there is someway to do so. Them getting hot will be the biggest problem.

>When they are being transport like this should the hive entrance be covered with something to keep the gals inside.

Screen. Also, if there is an inner cover, nail or staple it on and screen the hole on the inner cover and leave off the outer cover. Ventilation is your main concern. That and you don't want them all flying out and getting sucked out the back of the camper.

>Any other information that would be needed is greatly appreciated.

You can buy staples from beekeeping supply places or you can cut some 2" squares out of plywood and nail four of them on each connection from the bottom board to the bottom box and between each box so nothing slides around. A hand stapler, like a J21 or T50 (I prefer the J21) can be used to staple the corners of the inner cover so it doesn't slide around, or you can just nail down through it. I also like to strap it together (belt and suspenders approach) with a nylon cinch strap.

>Also I have thouroghly enjoyed reading many of the postings, it seems that every one is very willing to help each other. Some times I think I may be getting too much information and the more I get the more complicated this whole beekeeping thing appears to be.

Just listen to the bees.
The rest of us you can ignore if you like.
 

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Hi IBeeMe,

We recently brought two nucs home in our car!

Here's how we did it. I took my screened bottom board, deep super and hive cover (along with frames/foundation) over to where the nucs were.

We put the nuc frames with bees in the deep super, in the center...we left the 5 empty frames in the box with the nuc frames during transport.

We then used those wide flat straps that have the rachet type ends so you can tighten them down really snug and strapped all the pieces together (bottom board, deep super, top cover).

We used doubled over hardware cloth and cut it the exact length of the hive opening, stuffed it in there...then used duct tape to tape one end down against the bottom board.

We then loaded the bees into our Escort wagon, one 'hive' in the cargo area, the other one in the back seat.

We drove them back here, an hour away from their original home and didn't have a single escapee!


LaRae
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you Micheal and LaRae the info you have both provided, it is greatly appreciated. I hope that the seller and myself can come to an agreement, then you all shall be hearing from me often with plenty of questions. If the purchase can be completed the bees will have about a 3 to 4 hour travel time to get back to my home.
Have a good night
Randy
 

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I hauled three ten frame boxes and four five frame boxes of bees home in my minivan on Saturday. There were hundreds of escapees.
I wouldn't recommend this, ESPECIALLY for a newbee. You have to be able to be calm when a bee flies by you.
But most were just clustered on the boxes in the back. They were all screened in and the tops were stapled on. But there were lots of stragglers that had accumulated on the screens before I got them loaded.

I don't think I EVER moved bees where there weren't escapees, but then I've never worried enough about them to make sure there were none.
 

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I agree with everything Michael said, especially the part about leaving the entrance OPEN. That is, not screened. You will have to see it to believe it, but the bees will not try to leave t he hive.

Much more important...can you get the bees before 7:00 AM or after 8:00 PM? If not, up to 50% of the bees may be left behind as field bees! Or pray for a rainy day so you can sleep longer.

Charles
 
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